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Today's date is Saturday, June 23, 2018
Events for the public
 February 2018
Monday 26
18:15 - BOOK LAUNCH - Book Launch: Our Time has Come by Alyssa Ayres : Free Event Website | More Information
Please join AIIA WA and the Perth USAsia Centre with Alyssa Ayres to launch her new book Our Time has Come: How India is Making Its Place in the World. In Our Time Has Come, Alyssa Ayres considers the role India will play internationally, the obstacles it continues to face, and the implications of its rise for the United States and other nations. “We are witnessing a country chart its course to power, and explicitly seeking not to displace others but to be recognized among the club of world powers, one in which it believes its membership is long overdue.” Copies of the book will be available for purchase at a special discounted price of $30.00 from 6.15pm – 6.30pm and between 7.30pm – 7.45pm. Tickets to this event are free but registration is essential.
Tuesday 27
10:00 - FREE LECTURE - The United States and Australia: A Free and Open Indo-Pacific Website | More Information
As the US Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, stated last year in his landmark speech in India, the US and its key partners will strive to build mutually beneficial partnerships to safeguard a peaceful and stable Indo-Pacific in the coming years. This event will bring together foreign policy thought leaders from the United States, Australia, India and Japan to explore the future of the Indo-Pacific and what it means to have a free and open Indo-Pacific region. This event is a part of the Australia-US-Indo-Pacific Strategy Conference and is brought to you by the Perth USAsia Centre and the US Embassy in Canberra.Moderated by Professor Gordon Flake, CEO, Perth USAsia Centre.Please note, registrations will open at 9.30am.

 March 2018
Thursday 01
8:30 - CONFERENCE - Australia-Japan-U.S. Relations and the Indo-Pacific Symposium : Free Day Conference Website | More Information
This public symposium seeks to provide a strategic forum for policymakers, scholars, and business leaders in the region to grapple with the emergence of the “Indo-Pacific” as a regional construct. The economic rise of ASEAN, China, and India will change the existing global political and economic order. This symposium constitutes an effort to examine policy options for addressing the regional security and diplomatic problems which will emerge from these significant changes in the international system. Please note: Registrations will open at 8.00am.
Friday 02
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | Adam Pinto (piano) Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

Having just launched a new CD ‘Transformation’ of works by late UWA Faculty member Roger Smalley, talented pianist and Doctor of Musical Arts candidate Adam Pinto performs a free Lunchtime Concert of works for solo piano.

Entry is free - no bookings required.

15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Preparing for Beyond the Cradle : Public talk with Dr Sarah Jane Pell Website | More Information
Pell presents her artistic role in Performing Astronautics across the three phases of spaceflight as: the Architect (building new forms of Absolute Space), the Astronaut (embodying all of Representational Space), and the Avatar (live(d) art of Spaces of Representation). By framing her experimental and emerging practice as nodes of transfer and transformation, she explores movement in the relative qualities of space and spatiality over spaceflight time. By aligning her work to the gravity-shift arc of spaceflight, the artist hopes to prepare an embodied toolkit for audiences to experience new phenomena including the moment of earthly release, the orbital perspective or overview effect, and space-earth adaptation and residual bodily memory as described by many astronauts. For this, she suggests we design for a body of water.

Dr. Sarah Jane Pell’s practice intersects performing arts, interactivity design, and underwater diving – with parallel interests in human spaceflight and habitat technologies. Interested placing the body in real and imagined spaces for encountering “new frontier worlds”, Pell plays with elements of speculative fiction, live-lab style stunt and daring to explore the visceral and bodily fascination in high-risk exploration. An Undersea Simulation Astronaut to Project Moonwalk EU, Astronaut Candidate Project PoSSUM US, and Mars Desert Research Station MDRS Crew 188, she is carving out new opportunities for the artist-astronaut. Her Edith Cowan University PhD proposing ‘Aquabatics as new works of live art’ received Best PhD Art & Science, MIT LABS. She has logged over 500 commercial dives in zero visibility imagining an artist-in-space experience, with spin-off projects connecting to NASA, JAXA, ESA and the EU Commission. She has joined residencies and workshops including events hosted by SymbioticA: the art & science laboratory, the Arts Catalyst, Live Art Surgery, UK, International Space University, Singularity University and European Space Agency Topical Team Arts & Science (CoChair 2011-2014). Her work is exhibited, performed and published widely. Notable venues include Ars Electronica, Robotronica, CHI, MOMA, BEAP, NRLA, ISEA, NGV, PICA, PIAF, AIAF, MIAF, TNAM, & ESTEC. Dr. Pell is a TED Fellow, Gifted Citizen, and an Australia Council Fellow.

www.sarahjanepell.com www.artistastronaut.com
Tuesday 06
8:00 - WORKSHOP - Static Liquefaction Workshop : This two-day workshop aims to provide demonstrations of the static liquefaction failure mechanism (and triggering process) as it relates to tailings, and the tools used to assess the potential for this behaviour. Website | More Information
This two-day workshop aims to provide demonstrations of the static liquefaction failure mechanism (and triggering process) as it relates to tailings, and the tools used to assess the potential for this behaviour. This will be achieved through explanation on the use and interpretation of the cone penetration test (CPT); the key tool to assessing the strength and liquefaction susceptibility, and carrying out a static liquefaction laboratory test as a live demonstration during the workshop. Theoretical discussions will be alternated with examples from various tailings failure case histories, to highlight the relevance of the concepts and the meaning of the results. Mining and tailings consultants, operators of tailings storage facilities, and regulators will find this workshop of interest.

Workshop contents include: • Fundamentals and theory of cone penetration testing (CPT) • Interpretation of the CPT results • Static liquefaction, fundamentals and examples • Demonstration of the static liquefaction mechanism • Procedures and considerations for tailings laboratory testing • Explanation and discussion of a number of static liquefaction case histories
Wednesday 07
17:30 - Open Rehearsal - UWA Music presents: Converge | The Irwin Street Collective : Jamie Hey (cello) Website | More Information
Join us each week for a delightful musical surprise!

From young artist-led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind-the scenes workshops, lectures and masterclasses, these free weekly musical experiences will delight all music lovers.

This week join visiting artist Jamie Hey (cello) and UWA faculty Shaun Lee- Chen (violin), Cecilia Sun (fortepiano) and Emeritus Professor Paul Wright (viola) for a unique behind the scenes look into the rehearsal process as you observe these renowned musicians preparing for their upcoming performance.

Jamie Hey is Australia’s pre-eminent period cellist and a passionate researcher of the history, development and repertoire of the cello in 17th century Italy. He has been a member of the celebrated Australian Brandenburg Orchestra since 1995 and has been their principal cellist since 2002. He is a 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Entry is free - no bookings required.
Friday 09
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Free Lunchtime Concert | Piñata Percussion : Loops and Rebounds Preview Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday by our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the best musical talent from within the UWA Conservatorium of Music and around the country.

Week 2 - Piñata Percussion

Piñata Percussion is the resident percussion ensemble at UWA. Each year, Piñata’s concert season is opened with a program of new and existing works for percussion ensemble by Australian composers, allowing engagement with the nation’s leading creative minds in percussion composition and performance.

In 2018, Piñata celebrates the music of David Pye, an influential figure in Australian new music since the 1980s, who will be artist-in-residence with the ensemble in February and March.

This program celebrates Pye's significant contributions to Australian music with two works: 2003 percussion masterpiece 'rebana loops' and the world premiere of 'octet 112358'.

The program also features a new work from UWA graduate Adam Tan workshopped and developed for Piñata.

Entry is free - no bookings required.

14:30 - SEMINAR - Anthropology and Sociology Seminar Series Semester One 2018 : GENDER FLUIDITY AT WORK: EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION AGAINST THE NON-BINARY More Information
Using an experimental research design and a visual methodology, this study examines the extent of employment discrimination against non-binary job applicants whom identify and present as neither male, nor female. It employs social identity theory to investigate the way in which recruiters tend to categorize job applicants into discrete male or female social identities. The results of the study suggest that masculine men are rated significantly higher on employability than feminized men, feminine women, and masculinized women. Although there is a significant reduction in employability ratings between masculine men and feminized men, the same reduction is not found between feminine women and masculinized women. All women, regardless of their feminine or masculine characteristics, are rated equally low. The study has important implications for gender discrimination in employee selection decision-making.
Monday 12
17:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Public Lecture: The Hunger Project : Transformative Leadership to End Hunger: Applying Our Principles -- from Implementation to Impact Assessment to Investment Website | More Information
The Centre for Social Impact UWA is excited to host a public lecture with The Hunger Project. Join to hear their stories of impact from the organisation's global CEO Suzanne Frindt.

Suzanne Mayo Frindt is a leadership expert and President and CEO of The Global Hunger Project, a global non-profit organization working to end hunger and poverty by pioneering sustainable, grassroots, women-centered strategies and advocating for their widespread adoption in countries throughout the world.

Suzanne will speak to the importance of transformative leadership throughout The Hunger Project’s work: from the way in which The Hunger Project implements and measures its programs to the way it raises funds and shares its pioneering approaches with others. The Hunger Project is committed to creating a global transformation in the way the world works and invites all of us to engage as active citizens in this process.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Uluru Statement: Towards Truth and Justice Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Megan Davis, Pro Vice Chancellor Indigenous, Professor of Law, University of New South Wales and 2018 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

For over a decade, Australians have been debating whether and how to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples within Australia’s constitutional system. One of the most important moments in that debate occurred in May 2017, when hundreds of First Nations delegates gathered at a First Nations Constitutional Convention in Uluru to deliver the Uluru Statement from the Heart. Through the Uluru Statement, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples offered a clear and powerful vision of constitutional recognition, calling for voice, treaty and truth-telling.

Professor Megan Davis has been an influential figure in discussions over Indigenous constitutional recognition. As a member of the Federal Government’s Referendum Council, she played a pivotal role in the process that led to the Uluru Statement. In this lecture, Professor Davis will reflect on a decade of debates over constitutional recognition and examine the centrality of truth and justice to Indigenous aspirations for constitutional reform.

Professor Megan Davis is Pro Vice Chancellor Indigenous and Professor of Law, UNSW. She is an expert member of the United Nations Human Rights Council’s Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Professor Davis is a constitutional lawyer who was a member of the Referendum Council and the Expert Panel on the Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution.

The lecture is co-sponsored by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies, the UWA Law School and UWA School of Indigenous Studies.
Tuesday 13
16:00 - SEMINAR - CMSS Seminar on Religion and Politics in the Maldives More Information
The tiny Indian Ocean Muslim nation of the Maldives experienced a democratic transition in 2009. However, the country has been engulfed by a tumultuous politics. A dominant approach to understand its troubled politics is through the lens of religion. In this presentation, Azim Zahir will explain the larger transformations of Islam's relationship to politics in the country to explore its role – or the lack of it – in the country's political turmoil.

Azim Zahir is a final year PhD candidate at the University of Western Australia and works as a Research Assistant at the Centre for Muslim States and Societies, UWA. He has a Masters degree from the University of Sydney. His current research is on secularism, Islam and democracy in the Maldives and looks at how the implications of the research bear on prevailing thinking on Muslim politics. His previous research includes radicalisation in the Maldives.

ENTRY: Free. Please RSVP to cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au

19:30 - TALK - Friends of the UWA Library : Josephine Wilson discusses her award-winning book Extinctions More Information
About the talk

The Friends of the UWA Library are delighted to begin the 2018 series of talks with award-winning author, Josephine Wilson. Josephine will talk about her critically acclaimed book Extinctions.

Winner of the prestigious 2017 Miles Franklin Literary Award and Colin Roderick Award, nominated for the 2017 Prime Minister's Literary Awards, and before its publication, the winner of the inaugural 2015 Dorothy Hewett Award for an Unpublished Manuscript, Extinctions has been praised for its humour, poignancy and, from the 2017 Miles Franklin Literary Award judges’ comments, “a compassionate and unapologetically intelligent novel”.

Extinctions is a novel about all kinds of extinction – natural, racial, national and personal – and what we can do to prevent them. Josephine will share her inspiration, perspiration and insights to her work.

UWA Publishing will have copies of her book available for sale.

About the speaker

Josephine began her career in the area of performance. She completed a Masters of Philosophy at Queensland University and a PhD at the University of Western Australia.

She is the co-author of the performance/theatre work The Geography of Haunted Places, and author of the novel Cusp. She has reviewed for Realtime, ArtLink Magazine and for The West Australian, and is a board member for the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts.

Josephine has taught as sessional staff at Murdoch, UWA and Curtin University.

7.00 pm for a 7.30 start

Members: Free, Guests: $5 donation
Wednesday 14
13:00 - PUBLIC TALK - A van Gogh, a toilet, and the trumping of Trump : A Talking Allowed event Website | More Information
A Talking Allowed event with Associate Professor Clarissa Ball, Discipline Chair, History of Art, UWA School of Design and Director, UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

In late 2017, Donald and Melania Trump asked the Guggenheim Museum if they could borrow a van Gogh painting for their White House private quarters. Their request was rejected and countered with an offer of Maurizio Cattelan’s America, (2016) a fully functional 18-carat solid gold toilet that more than 100,000 people had already used. While some considered the Guggenheim’s offer a contemptible act of profanity, others claimed that the real work of art here was the suggestion that for the Trumps, a well-used toilet that reportedly cost in excess of $1 million to make was a more fitting artwork than a van Gogh.

Join us for this first Talking Allowed of 2018, when the complexities of this incident will be explored and we ask, what’s the fuss? After all, the toilet as subject and object of art has a long and noble history.

‘Talking Allowed’ is presented by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

On the second Wednesday of every month, a UWA academic will give a short presentation on a topic of current relevance to the arts and culture before inviting the audience to participate in discussion and debate.

‘Talking Allowed’ is designed to be thought-provoking, challenging, stimulating and engaging. Come along and join the dialogue on matters that are of great importance to our society.

17:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Converge | Miquel Bernat (marimba) Website | More Information
Join us each week for a delightful musical surprise!

From young artist-led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind-the scenes workshops, lectures and masterclasses, these free weekly musical experiences will delight all music lovers.

This week we welcome visiting artist Miquel Bernat.

Miquel received his musical education at the conservatories of Valencia, Madrid, Brussels and Rotterdam, and at the Aspen Summer Music Festival (USA). He was granted the "Premio Extraordinario Fin de Carrera" at the Conservatory of Madrid, the Special Prize for Percussion at the Dutch Gaudeamus Competition and the 2nd prize at the Aspen Nakamichi Competition.

Being a musician of great versatility, he has played with the Orquesta Ciutat de Barcelona and with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam, as well as in the contemporary music ensembles Ictus, Ictus Piano and Percussion Quartet, Trio Allures, Duo Contemporain, among others.

Miquel will perform works from Spanish composers featured in his new book of marimba etudes, plus percussion works by Alvarez, Applebaum and more.

Entry is free - no bookings required.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Women, Art and Violence in Seventeenth-Century Italian Art Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Susanne Meurer, School of Design, The University of Western Australia.

Virtuous women encountered a great deal of violence in early modern art – at times they were the victims of physical brutality or emotional cruelty, at times they were its righteous perpetrators. One of the most prominent and accomplished painters of both types of imagery happened to be a woman herself: Artemisia Gentileschi. As in the case of her friend Caravaggio, Artemisia’s work tends to be read through the prism of her life. The rape she suffered as a young woman is often thought to be reflected in the (re-)actions of her predominantly female heroines. Yet, is it wise to read biography into an artwork? To what extent are Artemisia’s visual strategies conditioned by her gender? Does a woman portray violence in a different way to a man?

This lecture is part of a lecture series: 'A Window on Italy – The Corsini Collection: Masterpieces from Florence'

The Institute of Advanced Studies is pleased to present a series of lectures to be held in conjunction with the exhibition, A Window on Italy – The Corsini Collection: Masterpieces from Florence, which is being held at the Art Gallery of Western Australia from 24 February – 18 June 2018.

The exhibition is organised by the Galleria Corsini, Florence, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tãmaki, the Art Gallery of Western Australia and MondoMostre, Rome..
Thursday 15
5:30 - FUNDRAISER - Team Perkins Designer Clothing Sale More Information
It’s on again, the 2018 Designer Clothing Sale, starting with the launch cocktail party on Thursday night from 5.30pm which will be the first opportunity to purchase a bargain.

Thursday night only works for some, so for those on campus we will be open all day Friday from 10am – 6pm.

This year we are introducing Saturday for weekend shoppers - we’ll open from 10am to 3pm. Items available to purchase include - dresses, jackets, coats, suits, shirts, skirts, pants, evening attire, scarves, shoes, hats, bags, belts and jewellery.

These clothes are either new (still with the tags on) or good condition second hand, some have never been worn.

Adam Heath, Bagutta, Harpers Emporium & other stores have agreed to support us again and we are enormously grateful to them.

All monies raised will support Team Perkins in the Hawaiian Walk for Women’s Cancer on Saturday May 5, 2018.

Looking forward to a terrific 2018 Designer Clothing Sale.

17:15 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Alan Sevier Memorial Lecture: Beefing up the West with genetics : Dr David Johnston will deliver the inaugural Alan Sevier Memorial Lecture during which he will discuss how genetic selection can be used across the beef supply chain to increase productivity and profitability Website | More Information
Recent advances in beef cattle genetics have the potential to change beef breeding. They can enable seedstock breeders to significantly increase rates of genetic progress and importantly at the commercial sector, allow producers to better match genetics to their production systems and markets. The talk will discuss how genetics and selection can be used across the beef supply chain to increase productivity and profitability. The presentation will cover recent advancements in beef cattle genetics including the evolving field of DNA and genomics, new genetic evaluation systems and the development of novel traits with a focus on northern systems.

Please register online at www.ioa.uwa.edu.au/events/register

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents: Piñata Percussion | Loops and Rebounds Website | More Information
Join us for a celebration of Australian music featuring works by David Pye

Piñata Percussion is the resident percussion ensemble at UWA. Each year, Piñata’s concert season is opened with a program of new and existing works for percussion ensemble by Australian composers, allowing engagement with the nation’s leading creative minds in percussion composition and performance.

In 2018, Piñata celebrates the music of David Pye, an influential figure in Australian new music since the 1980s. For three decades, Pye led a number of ensembles and projects from Fremantle, playing a pivotal role in establishing the flourishing percussion scene in WA. Pye will be artist-in-residence with Piñata in February and March. This program celebrates his significant contributions to Australian music with two works: Pye’s 2003 percussion masterpiece 'rebana loops' and the world premiere of 'octet 112358'.

The program also features a new work from UWA graduate Adam Tan workshopped and developed for Piñata ahead of Tan’s residency in Florida at the Florida Mallet Lab Summer Intensive in May, alongside works by artists from around Australia including Timothy Constable, Nigel Westlake, Vanessa Tomlinson.

Tickets: $15 Standard | $10 Concessions | Free for school students
Friday 16
11:00 - SEMINAR - Linguistics Seminar : Developments in the grammatical analysis of Central Australian languages 1890-1910 More Information
A number of grammatical descriptions of Arandic varieties from Central Australia appeared between 1890 and 1910. These reflect a variety of theoretical approaches to grammar which were emerging from German philology and linguistics in the early twentieth century. Far from being ahistorical, linguistic descriptions are informed by their theoretical roots and the context of their development, which can influence how we understand a given language. In this talk, I will consider the historical context of the grammars of Central Australian languages.

I compare Carl Strehlow’s Aranda grammar (1908; 1910) with Hermann Kempe’s grammar of 1891. Planert’s (1907) grammar was contemporary with Strehlow’s linguistic works and clearly influenced by Kempe’s earlier analyses. The dispute between Planert and Strehlow in the pages of the Zeitschrift für Ethnologie (Strehlow 1908; Planert 1908) throws the differences into sharp relief. Strehlow’s grammars effectively avoid some of the limitations of those of his predecessors. I will show that Strehlow’s training in translation and philology facilitated his understanding of the grammatical categories of Central Australian languages.

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