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Today's date is Sunday, January 21, 2018
Events for the public
 September 2017
Monday 25
9:00 - GUIDED TOUR - UWA Campus Tour : Start your pursuit with a UWA campus tour Website | More Information
Our stunning campus offers a vibrant and dynamic learning environment with its mix of heritage buildings, contemporary architecture and beautiful gardens. Current UWA students will take you on a tour of our campus giving you an insight into what it’s like to be a student at UWA.

Join us for informal morning tea after the tour. Our Future Students team will also be available to answer questions on courses, entry requirements and the UWA student experience.

All future students and their families are welcome.

Bookings are essential so please head to the webpage provided to register.

18:00 - EVENT - UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Special Event : Post-Memory: You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly More Information
Performance maker Mayu Kanamori and artist Terumi Narushima present a live performance of their work You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly. A multi-media presentation with piano accompaniment, Butterfly tells the story of Okin, a Japanese prostitute who travelled to the goldfields in Western Australia in the late 19th century. Following the performance, Mayu will present a brief lecture, discussing story-telling and memory-making in performance, and some of the issues of identity, heritage, and gender that this work addresses. After the lecture, there will be time for audience Q&A and discussion with the artists.

18:00 - EVENT - Post-Memory: You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly Website | More Information
A multi-media peformance and discussion with artists Mayu Kanamori and Terumi Narushima, Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellows.

Performance maker Mayu Kanamori and artist Terumi Narushima present a live performance of their work You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly.

A multi-media presentation with piano accompaniment, Butterfly tells the story of Okin, a Japanese prostitute who travelled to the goldfields in Western Australia in the late 19th century.

Following the performance, Mayu will present a brief lecture, discussing story-telling and memory-making in performance, and some of the issues of identity, heritage, and gender that this work addresses.

After the lecture, there will be time for audience Q&A and discussion with the artists.
Tuesday 26
0:00 - EVENT - Women in Asia Conference, September 26-28, 2017 : Women in the Asian Century: Challenges and Possibilities More Information
The Women in Asia (WIA) Conference continues a tradition started by the Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA) Women’s Caucus (now Women’s Forum) in 1981.

This will be the first time this Conference has been held on the west coast, and it follows the UWA hosting of the Asian Studies Association of Australia Conference in 2014.

The 2017 Women in Asia Conference provides an opportunity to showcase the work of scholars who research women and gender relations in Asia. WIA conferences particularly attract scholars and practitioners from Asia, as well as local and domestic participants from the community sector, academia and government.
Wednesday 27
16:00 - CANCELLED - STAFF EVENT - Futures Enthusiasts Meet-Up (FEMU) : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

We regret to advise that unfortunately the ‘Futures Enthusiasts Meet-Up and Windows into Homelessness Experience’ event scheduled to take place on Wednesday, 27 September 2017 from 4pm to 5pm has been cancelled.

Apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Kind regards

Centre for Education Futures

-----------------

Futures Enthusiasts are people who are keen to be a part of the next wave of developments in higher education using technology and concepts to innovate learning and teaching practices.

This FEMU event for September will feature a presentation by the UWA Centre for Social Impact on 'Windows into Homelessness 360 Experience'

The Windows into Homelessness project uses the latest consumer mobile and 360° video technologies to immerse students in local experiences of homelessness in a safe, authentic environment.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Thursday 28
13:00 - STAFF EVENT - PRESENTATION: Reflections on Flipping: A UWA Perspective : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
This will be a workshop based presentation drawing on Martin’s experience as “a flipper” and also on others from UWA that have been involved in a research project scoping student experiences in flipped classrooms. We will explore what the research shows as well as tips for shifting the focus from teaching to active learning, which is the main aim of shifting face to face engagement between lecturers and students from the delivery of content towards activities engaging the content that students have accessed in other places – usually their local LMS.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Friday 29
19:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - UWA Music presents: Aldo Di Toro : West Australian Opera Distinguished Artist Lecture Series Website | More Information
As a young man, Aldo Di Toro made his debut in opera as Oronte in Alcina for West Australian Opera at the Festival of Perth. He has sung with all the major opera companies in Australia, making his Opera Australia debut in 2007 singing Alfredo (La Traviata). Now living in Italy and performing internationally, Aldo di Toro returns to Perth to perform Edgardo in West Australian Opera’s forthcoming production of Lucia di Lammermoor.

In this WAO Distinguished Artists Lecture Series, don't miss this opportunity to hear Aldo talk about his experience working with directors and preparing roles for the world’s stages.

Entry is free - bookings essential

RSVP to concerts@uwa.edu.au

 October 2017
Monday 02
9:00 - Children's Activities - October School Holiday Chinese Cultural Activities for Children : Creative, affordable, interesting and educational activities for primary school children aged 6-12 years during October school holidays Website | More Information
Join us for a week of hands-on holiday fun this October school holidays. Sign up for a morning, a full day or the entire week – every day will be different. Each morning children can take part in a different Chinese cultural activity - bracelet making, lantern painting and decoration, paper cutting and poster making, kite making and decoration, fan painting and decoration.

In the afternoons children will enjoy time outdoors playing Chinese games, learning Tai Chi, and burning off some energy on the lawn in front of our building.

Toward the end of each day the children can wind down watching a Chinese film or cartoon and then learning a few words of Chinese while talking together about the show.

Our staff all have professional teaching expertise, special artistic skills and official Working With Children check certification.

These activities will be happening in the mornings: Monday, 2 October – Chinese bracelet making Tuesday, 3 October – Chinese lantern painting and decoration Wednesday, 4 October – Chinese paper cutting and poster making Thursday, 5 October – Chinese kite making and decoration Friday, 6 October – Chinese fan painting and decoration

Cost $50 per child for full day (including all activity materials, bottled water, morning and afternoon-tea snack) OR $20 per child for morning activity only (including all activity materials, bottled water, and morning-tea snack)

Book online : trybooking.com/SBCG (Only 20 places per day offered)

9:00 - CONFERENCE - In The Zone 2017 : The Blue Zone: Environment, Resources, and Security in the Indo-Pacific Maritime Realm Website | More Information
In collaboration with The University of Western Australia, the Perth USAsia Centre is pleased to announce that the 2017 In The Zone Conference – “The Blue Zone” will be held on Monday, 2 October 2017 in Perth, Western Australia. The conference will host a program of distinguished and expert speakers, including the Honourable Julie Bishop, Australia's Minister for Foreign Affairs, Dr Han Sueng-soo, former President of the United Nations General Assembly (2001) and former South Korean Prime Minister (2008-2009) and Mr Chris Salisbury, Chief Executive of Rio Tinto, Iron Ore. This year’s In The Zone Conference will spark a regional discussion that aims to contribute to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG14) of seeking to ‘Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources’. We would be delighted if you would join us here in Perth to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the Indo-Pacific’s maritime realm.
Thursday 05
9:00 - CONFERENCE - Afghanistan and the Region More Information
Afghanistan and the Region: Options for Australia

One-day conference organised jointly by the Centre for Muslim States and Societies, The University of Western Australia, and Australian Institute of International Affairs - Western Australia

Date: 5 October 2017

Time: 9am to 5pm

Venue: Conference Room, The University Club of Western Australia, Hackett Drive, Crawley WA

Cost: $100 standard; $50 students (To be paid in cash at the venue. Costs include morning tea, lunch, and afternoon tea)

Registration required via email to azim.zahir@uwa.edu.au before 4 October 2017.

The strategic scenario in Afghanistan and Pakistan is rapidly changing with President Trump’s announcement of a revamped US policy vis-à-vis the region. He has decided to increase the US troop presence in Afghanistan with the aim of ‘not nation-building …[but] killing terrorists’. His declared expectation of allies to do the same could include a request to the Australian Government to commit more troops to Afghanistan. The possibility of Australia returning to a combat role in Afghanistan to counter Taliban resurgence raises a number of questions about the future scenarios in the region. These include:

What are the main challenges to ensuring Afghanistan’s stability and how could they best be met through regional responses?

How could Afghanistan and Pakistan work together to meet these challenges?

What are the likely responses of other regional states to the revised US strategy on Afghanistan, particularly China and India?

What policy options does Australia have in the region in terms of increasing combat role and/or finding political solutions to the continuing instability in Afghanistan?

The one-day Conference on Afghanistan and the Region aims to explore answers to these questions. Conference to be held under Chatham House rules in order to facilitate discussion.

Speakers include:

Keynote Speech: HE Mr. Masood Khalid, Ambassador of Pakistan to Peoples’ Republic of China, Beijing.

Ms. Rachel L. Cooke, Consul General, U.S. Consulate General, Perth

Professor Amin Saikal, Director, Center for Arab and Islamic Studies, The Australian National University, Canberra

Emeritus Professor James Trevelyan, School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, University of Western Australia, Perth.

Dr Rajat Ganguly, Academic Chair, Security, Terrorism and Counterterrorism Studies, Murdoch University, Perth.

Dr Leah Farrall, Fmr Counter Terrorism Intelligence Analyst, Canberra.

Dr Shanthie Mariet D’Souza, Murdoch University and Founder & President of Mantraya, Perth.

David Singer, Afghanistan Veteran, and Member of the Returned and Services League of Australia (RSL).

Professor Samina Yasmeen, Director, Centre for Muslim States and Societies, University of Western Australia, Perth.

16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series 2017 : Megafauna mass deaths at Lancefield Swamp, southeastern Australia: a case study in extinction processes? More Information
The deaths of thousands of giant kangaroos (Macropus giganteus titan) in one location make for an impressive palaeontological site. Deposition of macropod remains at Lancefield Swamp, Victoria (south-eastern Australia), spans the period of human arrival in Australia, although the site provides limited evidence of human activity. Exploration of the factors causing mass deaths has focussed on the timing of site formation events and the local and regional context. Dating has proved challenging, but recently published results from OSL and ESR analyses, combined with taphonomic and sedimentological studies, indicate that in situ macropod remains date from c.80,000 to c.45,000 years ago. The faunal assemblage is dominated by megafaunal adult Macropus, consistent with mass die-offs due to severe drought. Such droughts may have recurred over millennia during the climatic variability of Marine Isotope Stages 4 and 3. In this scenario, only the very youngest fossil deposits at Lancefield could be coeval with the earliest human arrivals, and anthropogenic causes cannot be implicated in most macropod deaths at the site. Climatic and environmental changes were the main factors in site formation and megafauna deaths at Lancefield Swamp. It also appears that megafauna recovered between putative drought periods, and either disappeared or were dwarfed some millennia after humans appeared in the record. These particular observations suggest that extinction processes are complex and multiple, possibly synergistic factors are involved.
Friday 06
11:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar Series, Seminar 1 2017 : I thought that I don’t qualify to call Korean my ‘national language’: Identity and authenticity in Korean-Australian heritage language learners More Information
This study aims to understand the process of identity development and perception of speaker’s authenticity in students of Korean as a heritage language enrolled in an Australian university. The history of Korean- Australians in more recent and different compared to that of Korean- Americans. Statistics from the 2016 Australian national census show that 95% of respondents of Korean heritage speak Korean as a home language. Within this reality this paper, by focusing on the Korean language use of young Korean-Australians, aims at revealing the process of identity development and the issue of authenticity that arise when developing bilingualism and biculturalism. As investigation tool the researcher used an on-line blog writing activity adapted for a university course of Korean as heritage language. By analysing posts and comments uploaded on the blog, this study reveals that parents’ influence, experiences related to the advantages of bilingualism and a strong monolingual discourse influence identity development and perceptions of authenticity in Korean-Australian university students of Korean.

17:00 - EVENT - Light the Night - Perth : Leukaemia Foundation's annual fundraising walk to help more Australians beat blood cancer by improving survival rates and quality of life. Website | More Information
Today another 35 Australians will be told they have blood cancer.

In this darkest moment, they are not alone.

By raising money and carrying a lantern at Light the Night you can light the way for them and support the Leukaemia Foundation.

Together we can provide support and services to beat their blood cancer.

Join us for an inspiring lantern walk on campus.

It will be an evening for the whole family with plenty of entertainment & food stalls available.

Register now on the website.

#LightheNightAU

17:00 - EVENT - Fridays@Five : UWA String Orchestra & The Darlington Ensemble: Shostakovich Chamber Symphony Website | More Information
Fridays@Five offers a unique musical experience to delight all music lovers, from young artist led concerts, informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind the scenes workshops to lectures and masterclasses. Join us this week for a special performance by the UWA String Orchestra accompanied by The Darlington Chamber Ensemble!

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - ‘Invisible Maps: Cartographic Coding in Shakespeare’s Henry V and Julius Caesar' : A PMRG/CMEMS Public Lecture Website | More Information
The year of 1599 was a turning point both for England and for William Shakespeare. Ever since the failed Spanish armada of 1588 there had been serious threats of a fresh incursion. Contrary to much popular belief today, the Spanish threat did not die with Queen Mary’s widowed husband, Philip II of Spain, in 1598. Unwillingly and with great reservations Queen Elizabeth sent the Earl of Essex to quell rebellion in Ireland early in 1599, which was feared to become the launching point for a combined attack from the two Catholic countries of Spain and Ireland. Essex’s mission to defeat or enlist support from the Irish, who had taken a dislike to being progressively invaded and colonised through several monarchies in the sixteenth century, quickly came unstuck. He sailed for Ireland in March with the prospect of victory loudly proclaimed (by Shakespeare among others) but was to return in disgrace by September, uninvited and unwelcome. His sole achievement seems to have been taking the initiative of being the Queen’s deputy in Ireland to knight hundreds of his followers. The queen was not amused to have her authority so lightly traduced.

In Henry V Shakespeare implicitly parallels the expected progress of Essex with the actual progress of the warrior-king. Momentarily the comparison becomes explicit in the Chorus preceding Act 5 of the play, with a prayer for the safe return of Essex. The play would have been first performed soon after the departure of Essex to Ireland. Towards the end of the year came Julius Caesar. Again there is a warrior figure in the title role, but this time the story is one of failure: the play tells of suspicion that dangerous ambition will overwhelm the state. Allusion to the fall of Essex is suggestive rather than precise, but Shakespeare’s audience would have made connections between Essex and Caesar: there were fears that Essex would use success in Ireland to depose the Queen or at least render her subservient to his power. As it happened, a little over a year after his return, Essex did attempt to ride into London with his followers, fulfilling an absurd ambition to take control.

In this lecture, each of these plays will be conceptually charted against a specific cartographic model. For Henry V there is the Ptolemaic map of Anglia by Christopher Saxton (created as the frontispiece to his atlas presented to the Queen on the twenty-first anniversary of her rule). For Julius Caesar the mappa mundi of humanist tradition is evoked, with specific reference to the Hereford map. Each of these two cartographic paradigms suggests its own network of cultural significances in the two plays. This discussion will be offered with illustrated reference to specific maps and their meanings.

This lecture will open the CMEMS/PMRG conference, 'The Natural and the Supernatural in medieval and Early Modern Worlds'. For more information, see http://conference.pmrg.org.au/
Saturday 07
9:00 - SYMPOSIUM - 'The Natural and the Supernatural in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds' : Annual PMRG/CMEMS Conference Website | More Information
Today, the natural and the supernatural are often viewed in stark opposition. In the medieval and early modern period, however, the supernatural infused every aspect of daily life. Prayers and rites punctuated everyday routines, and natural phenomena – such as earthquakes and eclipses – were often viewed with both suspicion and wonder or as divine portents. Miracle stories, rumours of witchcraft, and accounts of relic veneration all indicate that magic shaped medieval and early modern imaginations. The early modern period was also an era of European exploration, invasion and colonisation, which saw the increase of scientific knowledge though encounters with a number of societies around the globe. Natural histories, travel narratives, and objects circulated widely, creating new connections and shaping existing belief systems. As these sources demonstrate, however, persecution also abounded, and was often prompted by perceived differences in culture or beliefs about the (super)natural.

This conference will examine the numerous and various intersections of the natural and the supernatural. What qualified as natural and supernatural in diverse medieval and early modern societies? When was the world categorised in terms of a natural/supernatural binary? When was this not the case? How did people in medieval and early modern societies perceive and experience these phenomena? How and why did beliefs and structures based on understandings of the natural and the supernatural change in this period? What prompted persecution? How are these events represented and experienced through heritage today?

10:00 - SYMPOSIUM - BATAVIA (1629): giving voice to the voiceless Website | More Information
When the Dutch East India vessel Batavia was wrecked on Morning Reef in the Abrolhos Islands in June 1629, none of the more than 300 people on board could have imagined the enduring historical impact of this maritime disaster and its bloody aftermath. Those events have inspired a multitude of books, several documentaries for television and radio, a musical, an opera, and numerous art works and exhibitions.

This free public symposium is being held in conjunction with the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery exhibition BATAVIA (1629): giving voice to the voiceless. Co-hosted by the UWA Cultural Precinct and the Institute of Advanced Studies, this is an opportunity to hear from artists whose work is displayed in the exhibition and from a diverse group of experts who have played a key role in understanding those events of 1629.

Speakers include:

Robert Cleworth (Artist, New South Wales); Alec Coles OBE, CEO WA Museum; Dr Daniel Franklin (The University of Western Australia); Professor Jane Lydon (The University of Western Australia); Professor Alistair Paterson (The University of Western Australia); Corioli Souter (The University of Western Australia; Western Australian Museum); Dr Paul Uhlmann (Artist, Western Australia; Edith Cowan University); Arvi Wattel (The University of Western Australia).
Tuesday 10
13:00 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations Seminar Series 2017 : Are We in an Age of Inequality and if so What Should be Done About It? More Information
Rising economic inequality has become a global concern over recent years. A number of studies point to a widening of the gap between rich and poor, a trend that could well be undermining the social consensus on which democratic capitalism has successfully functioned since the Second World War. This presentation outlines the nature of the issue and explores some of the analytical and political challenges involved, paying particular attention to where Australia sits in the global debate. Dr Alan Fenna is a professor of politics at the John Curtin Institute of Public Policy, Curtin University. He researches in the areas of economic and social policy, and Australian and comparative federalism and has just completed an Australian Research Council funded study of the redistributive impacts of the Australian welfare state. He is the author of Australian Public Policy (2005); co-editor of Government and Politics in Australia (2014); and co-author of Comparative Federalism: a systematic inquiry (2015) as well as a range of academic journal articles and book chapters. He has been awarded the Australian Political Studies Association’s Mayer Journal prize for the best article in the Australian Journal of Political Science three times and served as President of the Australian Political Studies Association 2009–10.

19:00 - TALK - Friends of the UWA Library Speaker : A History of the Chinese in Western Australia More Information
About the talk

Gold was the lure for many Chinese coming to Australia. To many Australians the early Chinese came, found their fortune and returned home with full pockets. However this was not the case for the majority of early Chinese. When gold was found in the Swan River Colony, regulations limited Asians from gaining mining permits. There is so much more to the Chinese story prior to and after the discovery of gold.

This talk gives a brief background into the life of the early Chinese in WA and then takes a journey through Karrakatta Cemetery to reveal some untold stories.

About the Speaker

Kaylene Poon is a third generation Australian-born Chinese. Northbridge was her childhood stamping ground, as her parents took over the only Chinese grocery shop in James Street in 1954. Being next door to the Chung Wah Hall meant her father was instrumental in assisting many elderly Chinese living out their final days, far from family and loved ones.

Currently Kaylene is the Local History Officer for the City of Melville, based at the Wireless Hill Museum. She previously worked for the WA Museum at the History (the former Lunatic Asylum) and the Maritime Museums. In 1999 together with the National Trust she assisted in the development of an educational package for secondary and primary students and for a decade offered interactive visits to the Chung Wah and James Street.

Members: Free, Guests: $5 donation
Wednesday 11
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - How FinTech is Changing the Face of Business and Finance Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor David Yermack, Chairman, Finance Department, Stern School of Business, New York University and UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

The finance industry, which earns disproportionate profits, is set to be revolutionised by advances in financial technology (FinTech) rendering many finance jobs obsolete. The changes also challenge our existing notions of money and value.

In this public lecture, David Yermack, a leading authority on FinTech, will provide an accessible guide to the FinTech revolution and its implications for both laypersons and finance professionals.

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