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Today's date is Friday, September 22, 2017
Events for the public
 September 2017
Monday 18
11:00 - EVENT - SHOWCASE: Ruby the Robot : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Ruby is a NAO robot, NAO is the world’s leading and most widely used humanoid robot for education, healthcare, and research. NAO is 58cm tall, autonomous, and fully programmable robot that can walk, talk and listen. Meet Ruby, see what she can do and explore the problem solving required when coding and opportunities to use Robots in learning and teaching.

Many have seen her guiding and touring through the Futures Observatory and now after more work from our Computer Science students we have enabled more of her functionality and designed new code for her better interact with humans. Some of her new abilities include:

THE RED BALL: Explore with Ruby the problem solving required to manoeuvre obstacles using her feet sensors and cameras located on her body. Then work with her to interact and play with a red ball aiming to shoot a goal, and hearing her interactivity as she recognises either a hit or miss.

WHO AM I: Have a conversation with Ruby as she learns to recognise your face and has a personalised conversation with you. Demonstrating her facial recognition technology and ability to transform a conversation with her artificial intelligence you can engage with the future of soft skills that all artificial intelligent robots will possess.

SIMON SAYS: Watch Ruby follow instructions you give her as she replicates the movements spoken. By interacting in this way, you can see her 25 degrees of freedom and dexterity from her fingers, showing humanoid movements a robot can perform that you have never seen before!

We will have some of our students present during these events to talk about the challenges and successes they had in the project and their foray into a career in coding and robotics.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Tuesday 19
13:00 - STAFF EVENT - DEMONSTRATION: Using Blackboard Mobile Compatible Tests : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Are you aware of the mobile test creation tool which is compatible with the Blackboard Learn App? If not attend this demonstration using Blackboard’s Mobile Compatible Test as a feature for students to easily complete tests and surveys using their mobile devices.

There are many great applications for this feature, such as, completing Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) while on a field trip, or encouraging students to complete a quick survey on a peer activity, or inviting students to upload diagrams as evidence of their formative assessment.

Using current samples from a number of UWA LMS units, Learning Technologist Ezrina Fewings will inform attendees on how to create a Blackboard Mobile Compatible Test app and developing preloaded feedback as well as providing advice on generating a workflow using the Blackboard Learn App.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.

18:00 - CANCELLED - FREE LECTURE - Fish and Sharks... Marine Parks and our Oceans : Come share a research journey across Australia's top end Website | More Information
Unfortunately this event has been cancelled.

We have unfortunately had to postpone our public lecture for extenuated circumstances. We are looking forward to organising another time soon to share our research findings.

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Fish and sharks ... marine parks and our oceans - come share a research journey across Australia’s top end.

Please join the University of Western Australia Marine Futures team at the WA Maritime Museum, Peter Hughs Drive, Victoria Quay, Fremantle to share their findings after four months of research on the motor yacht Pangaea. This free public lecture begins at 6pm on Tuesday 19th September and will showcase recent expedition highlights, followed by an opportunity to discuss the research with team members from 7.15pm in the Museum Cafe.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Resource Extraction versus Environmental Protection: oil sands and caribou in Canada : 2017 Rio Tinto Lecture Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Vic Adamowicz, Vice Dean, Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, and Professor, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, University of Alberta.

This case study will illustrate some of the challenges of endangered species recovery, focussing on caribou in Alberta, Canada, and the threats they face from the oil sands industry.

In any jurisdiction involved in resource extraction there are concerns about the environmental impacts of the extractive activities, including impacts on natural systems, human health, scenery, recreational enjoyment, and other “ecosystem services”. Caribou have been listed as threatened in Canada for sometime, but strategies for their protection are complex and could have significant impacts on forestry and energy sectors. Issues of the development of recovery goals, the economic costs and benefits of caribou recovery, the importance of the timing of recovery, and the policy options that can help achieve recovery at least cost, will be addressed.

Economic analysis has been used to identify options and strategies for reducing adverse impacts and reducing the requirement for costly recovery to maintain the species.

The Rio Tinto Lecture at UWA is part of the Rio Tinto-UWA Education Partnership, established in 2013.

This event is sponsored by Rio Tinto, UWA Faculty of Science, and the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.
Wednesday 20
13:00 - EVENT - The Death of this Norm is Greatly Exaggerated More Information
This paper argues that the literature on ‘norm death’ is both empirically and theoretically flawed. This literature has argued that a wide range of norms, such as the norm against torture, the norm requiring declarations of war, the norm against mercenary use, and the norm against unrestricted submarine warfare, are either ‘dead’ or under significant challenge. The literature argues that the cause of norm death is widespread violation. We argue, in contrast, that these norms are not dead, and that it is more useful to think of norm obsolescence, modification, and replacement. We argue that norm death is unlikely because norms are surprisingly resilient, because they have long life-spans; because implementation makes them hard to alter; and because they are embedded in in wider complexes of norms.

Sarah Percy moved to UQ from UWA in 2016. Prior to her appointment at UWA, Sarah was University Lecturer and Tutorial Fellow in International Relations at the University of Oxford (Merton College). At Oxford, Sarah was on the steering committee of the Oxford Programme on the Changing Character of War. Sarah did her M.Phil and D.Phil as a Commonwealth Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford.

17:00 - EVENT - Psychology Postgraduate Information Session (For 2018 Postgraduate Programs) More Information
Join us at our information session to find out about the Psychology postgraduate programs at UWA.

Students who possess or expect to gain an honours degree (or equivalent) in Psychology are encouraged to attend the information sessions for the postgraduate programs offered by the School of Psychological Science at the University of Western Australia.

* Our professional programs in Psychology are accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council and approved by the relevant Colleges of APS.

General Introduction & Application Information 5.00 pm –5.30 pm

Wilsmore Lecture Theatre

•Professor Romola Bucks (Head of School) •Linda Thomas (Academic Services Team Leader)



Program Specific Sessions 5.40 pm –7.00 pm

Accelerated Learning Lab (ground floor GPB3 building)

Academic staff, alumni and current postgraduate students will run program specific sessions in small groups on the following:

•Clinical Psychology* •Clinical Neuropsychology* •Industrial and Organisational Psychology * •PhD •Autism Diagnosis

Afterwards, session conveners will be available for follow up questions.

There will also be an opportunity to meet potential PhD supervisors at the program specific sessions.



RSVP Drinks and light refreshments will be provided during the program specific session.

If you would like to attend this event please RSVP to postgradinfo-sps@uwa.edu.au by 13thSeptember 2017
Thursday 21
13:00 - STAFF EVENT - WORKSHOP: Recording Video Using Your Mobile Device : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
In this workshop gain practical hands on experience in creating high quality videos to engage, inspire and motivate students using your smartphone or tablet. You will learn how to plan, compose, record, and edit your video before having a chance to put your new skills into action in the field!

Note: Bring your own mobile device for the workshop or borrow one of ours.

16:00 - PUBLIC TALK - History Post-Brexit: thinking through Britain, Europe and Empire Website | More Information
A public lecture by Tony Ballantyne, Professor of History and Pro-Vice Chancellor Humanities at the University of Otago, and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Colonial Culture.

The links between British empire building and its shifting relationships with Europe have frequently been overlooked by historians, in part because they have been seen as two fundamentally distinct fields of inquiry.

Using the debates around Brexit as it departure point, this talk explores some of the key connections between the project of empire building and Britain’s engagements with Europe, tracing some key points of convergence from the 1760s on. But it will also explore the shifting terrain of recent historiography, tracing the ways in which Europe and empire have figured within British historical writing since the 1970s and how those relationships have also figured in important work from the former settler colonies.

17:15 - FREE LECTURE - Australia's High Commissioner to India, Ms Harinder Sidhu - Realising the Indo-Pacific: Tasks for India's Regional Integration : Free Presentation/Panel Discussion Website | More Information
It is our pleasure to invite you to a public event featuring Australia's High Commissioner to India, Ms Harinder Sidhu, to launch the Perth USAsia Centre's newest publication, Realising the Indo-Pacific: Tasks for India's Regional Integration, and explore the future opportunities and challenges for India's integration into the Indo-Pacific region. Strategic experts in Australia and the United States have adopted the 'Indo-Pacific', however, India's strategic community has yet to use the construct to understand the international system around them. Without India's economic growth and involvement in the region, the Indo-Pacific cannot be fully realised and this has implications on Australia's national interest for a rules-based global order. Please join us to hear a keynote address from Australia's High Commissioner to India, Ms Harinder Sidhu, followed by a panel discussion with Professor L. Gordon Flake, CEO of the Perth USAsia Centre and Professor Stephen Smith, Director and Distinguished Fellow of the Perth USAsia Centre and former Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade. We look forward to seeing you there. Regards, Perth USAsia Centre
Monday 25
9:00 - GUIDED TOUR - UWA Campus Tour : Start your pursuit with a UWA campus tour Website | More Information
Our stunning campus offers a vibrant and dynamic learning environment with its mix of heritage buildings, contemporary architecture and beautiful gardens. Current UWA students will take you on a tour of our campus giving you an insight into what it’s like to be a student at UWA.

Join us for informal morning tea after the tour. Our Future Students team will also be available to answer questions on courses, entry requirements and the UWA student experience.

All future students and their families are welcome.

Bookings are essential so please head to the webpage provided to register.

18:00 - EVENT - UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Special Event : Post-Memory: You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly More Information
Performance maker Mayu Kanamori and artist Terumi Narushima present a live performance of their work You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly. A multi-media presentation with piano accompaniment, Butterfly tells the story of Okin, a Japanese prostitute who travelled to the goldfields in Western Australia in the late 19th century. Following the performance, Mayu will present a brief lecture, discussing story-telling and memory-making in performance, and some of the issues of identity, heritage, and gender that this work addresses. After the lecture, there will be time for audience Q&A and discussion with the artists.

18:00 - EVENT - Post-Memory: You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly Website | More Information
A multi-media peformance and discussion with artists Mayu Kanamori and Terumi Narushima, Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellows.

Performance maker Mayu Kanamori and artist Terumi Narushima present a live performance of their work You’ve Mistaken Me for a Butterfly.

A multi-media presentation with piano accompaniment, Butterfly tells the story of Okin, a Japanese prostitute who travelled to the goldfields in Western Australia in the late 19th century.

Following the performance, Mayu will present a brief lecture, discussing story-telling and memory-making in performance, and some of the issues of identity, heritage, and gender that this work addresses.

After the lecture, there will be time for audience Q&A and discussion with the artists.
Tuesday 26
0:00 - EVENT - Women in Asia Conference, September 26-28, 2017 : Women in the Asian Century: Challenges and Possibilities More Information
The Women in Asia (WIA) Conference continues a tradition started by the Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA) Women’s Caucus (now Women’s Forum) in 1981.

This will be the first time this Conference has been held on the west coast, and it follows the UWA hosting of the Asian Studies Association of Australia Conference in 2014.

The 2017 Women in Asia Conference provides an opportunity to showcase the work of scholars who research women and gender relations in Asia. WIA conferences particularly attract scholars and practitioners from Asia, as well as local and domestic participants from the community sector, academia and government.
Wednesday 27
16:00 - STAFF EVENT - Futures Enthusiasts Meet-Up (FEMU) : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Futures Enthusiasts are people who are keen to be a part of the next wave of developments in higher education using technology and concepts to innovate learning and teaching practices.

This FEMU event for September will feature a presentation by the UWA Centre for Social Impact on 'Windows into Homelessness 360 Experience'

The Windows into Homelessness project uses the latest consumer mobile and 360° video technologies to immerse students in local experiences of homelessness in a safe, authentic environment.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Thursday 28
13:00 - STAFF EVENT - PRESENTATION: Reflections on Flipping: A UWA Perspective : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
This will be a workshop based presentation drawing on Martin’s experience as “a flipper” and also on others from UWA that have been involved in a research project scoping student experiences in flipped classrooms. We will explore what the research shows as well as tips for shifting the focus from teaching to active learning, which is the main aim of shifting face to face engagement between lecturers and students from the delivery of content towards activities engaging the content that students have accessed in other places – usually their local LMS.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.

 October 2017
Monday 02
9:00 - CONFERENCE - In The Zone 2017 : The Blue Zone: Environment, Resources, and Security in the Indo-Pacific Maritime Realm Website | More Information
In collaboration with The University of Western Australia, the Perth USAsia Centre is pleased to announce that the 2017 In The Zone Conference – “The Blue Zone” will be held on Monday, 2 October 2017 in Perth, Western Australia. The conference will host a program of distinguished and expert speakers, including the Honourable Julie Bishop, Australia's Minister for Foreign Affairs, Dr Han Sueng-soo, former President of the United Nations General Assembly (2001) and former South Korean Prime Minister (2008-2009) and Mr Chris Salisbury, Chief Executive of Rio Tinto, Iron Ore. This year’s In The Zone Conference will spark a regional discussion that aims to contribute to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG14) of seeking to ‘Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources’. We would be delighted if you would join us here in Perth to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the Indo-Pacific’s maritime realm.
Friday 06
17:00 - EVENT - Light the Night - Perth : Leukaemia Foundation's annual fundraising walk to help more Australians beat blood cancer by improving survival rates and quality of life. Website | More Information
Today another 35 Australians will be told they have blood cancer.

In this darkest moment, they are not alone.

By raising money and carrying a lantern at Light the Night you can light the way for them and support the Leukaemia Foundation.

Together we can provide support and services to beat their blood cancer.

Join us for an inspiring lantern walk on campus.

It will be an evening for the whole family with plenty of entertainment & food stalls available.

Register now on the website.

#LightheNightAU

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - ‘Invisible Maps: Cartographic Coding in Shakespeare’s Henry V and Julius Caesar' : A PMRG/CMEMS Public Lecture Website | More Information
The year of 1599 was a turning point both for England and for William Shakespeare. Ever since the failed Spanish armada of 1588 there had been serious threats of a fresh incursion. Contrary to much popular belief today, the Spanish threat did not die with Queen Mary’s widowed husband, Philip II of Spain, in 1598. Unwillingly and with great reservations Queen Elizabeth sent the Earl of Essex to quell rebellion in Ireland early in 1599, which was feared to become the launching point for a combined attack from the two Catholic countries of Spain and Ireland. Essex’s mission to defeat or enlist support from the Irish, who had taken a dislike to being progressively invaded and colonised through several monarchies in the sixteenth century, quickly came unstuck. He sailed for Ireland in March with the prospect of victory loudly proclaimed (by Shakespeare among others) but was to return in disgrace by September, uninvited and unwelcome. His sole achievement seems to have been taking the initiative of being the Queen’s deputy in Ireland to knight hundreds of his followers. The queen was not amused to have her authority so lightly traduced.

In Henry V Shakespeare implicitly parallels the expected progress of Essex with the actual progress of the warrior-king. Momentarily the comparison becomes explicit in the Chorus preceding Act 5 of the play, with a prayer for the safe return of Essex. The play would have been first performed soon after the departure of Essex to Ireland. Towards the end of the year came Julius Caesar. Again there is a warrior figure in the title role, but this time the story is one of failure: the play tells of suspicion that dangerous ambition will overwhelm the state. Allusion to the fall of Essex is suggestive rather than precise, but Shakespeare’s audience would have made connections between Essex and Caesar: there were fears that Essex would use success in Ireland to depose the Queen or at least render her subservient to his power. As it happened, a little over a year after his return, Essex did attempt to ride into London with his followers, fulfilling an absurd ambition to take control.

In this lecture, each of these plays will be conceptually charted against a specific cartographic model. For Henry V there is the Ptolemaic map of Anglia by Christopher Saxton (created as the frontispiece to his atlas presented to the Queen on the twenty-first anniversary of her rule). For Julius Caesar the mappa mundi of humanist tradition is evoked, with specific reference to the Hereford map. Each of these two cartographic paradigms suggests its own network of cultural significances in the two plays. This discussion will be offered with illustrated reference to specific maps and their meanings.

This lecture will open the CMEMS/PMRG conference, 'The Natural and the Supernatural in medieval and Early Modern Worlds'. For more information, see http://conference.pmrg.org.au/
Saturday 07
9:00 - SYMPOSIUM - 'The Natural and the Supernatural in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds' : Annual PMRG/CMEMS Conference Website | More Information
Today, the natural and the supernatural are often viewed in stark opposition. In the medieval and early modern period, however, the supernatural infused every aspect of daily life. Prayers and rites punctuated everyday routines, and natural phenomena – such as earthquakes and eclipses – were often viewed with both suspicion and wonder or as divine portents. Miracle stories, rumours of witchcraft, and accounts of relic veneration all indicate that magic shaped medieval and early modern imaginations. The early modern period was also an era of European exploration, invasion and colonisation, which saw the increase of scientific knowledge though encounters with a number of societies around the globe. Natural histories, travel narratives, and objects circulated widely, creating new connections and shaping existing belief systems. As these sources demonstrate, however, persecution also abounded, and was often prompted by perceived differences in culture or beliefs about the (super)natural.

This conference will examine the numerous and various intersections of the natural and the supernatural. What qualified as natural and supernatural in diverse medieval and early modern societies? When was the world categorised in terms of a natural/supernatural binary? When was this not the case? How did people in medieval and early modern societies perceive and experience these phenomena? How and why did beliefs and structures based on understandings of the natural and the supernatural change in this period? What prompted persecution? How are these events represented and experienced through heritage today?

10:00 - SYMPOSIUM - BATAVIA (1629): giving voice to the voiceless Website | More Information
When the Dutch East India vessel Batavia was wrecked on Morning Reef in the Abrolhos Islands in June 1629, none of the more than 300 people on board could have imagined the enduring historical impact of this maritime disaster and its bloody aftermath. Those events have inspired a multitude of books, several documentaries for television and radio, a musical, an opera, and numerous art works and exhibitions.

This free public symposium is being held in conjunction with the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery exhibition BATAVIA (1629): giving voice to the voiceless. Co-hosted by the UWA Cultural Precinct and the Institute of Advanced Studies, this is an opportunity to hear from artists whose work is displayed in the exhibition and from a diverse group of experts who have played a key role in understanding those events of 1629.

Speakers include:

Robert Cleworth (Artist, New South Wales); Alec Coles OBE, CEO WA Museum; Dr Daniel Franklin (The University of Western Australia); Professor Jane Lydon (The University of Western Australia); Professor Alistair Paterson (The University of Western Australia); Corioli Souter (The University of Western Australia; Western Australian Museum); Dr Paul Uhlmann (Artist, Western Australia; Edith Cowan University); Arvi Wattel (The University of Western Australia).

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