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Today's date is Wednesday, September 20, 2017
Events for the public
 September 2017
Saturday 02
17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents Keys in the City : An interactive journey of the history of keyboard instruments Website | More Information
Renowned Perth piano technician Paul Tunzi celebrates 40 years in the business by taking you on an interactive journey of discovery and learning as keyboard instruments from the 1700s to the present day are brought to life by some of Perth’s finest pianists.

Discover the instruments! Clavichord, Harpsichord, Square Piano, Fortepiano and Modern Piano.

Discover repertoire! From Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical and Romantic to Contemporary and Jazz.

Discover the musicians! Graeme Gilling, Geoffrey Lancaster AM, Tom O’Halloran, Anna Sleptsova, Stewart Smith, Ceclia Sun, Raymond Yong and David Wickham.

Discover the journey of keyboard! Have a go playing a grand piano, harpsichord and fortepiano; View a disassembled grand piano and; Explore the Stuart Symonds collection of Keyboard Instruments, including the 'First Fleet Piano' (the first piano to arive in Australia!

Tours on the hour: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm **ALL TOURS HAVE SOLD OUT** New VIP Concert: 5pm (Government House Ballroom)

Tours are free but bookings are essential **SOLD OUT** VIP Concert: $15 Adults, $7.50 Children

trybooking.com/OWRR
Monday 04
9:00 - EVENT - Research Week : 4 - 8 September 2017 More Information
Visit UWA from 4 - 8 September for UWA Research Week when we showcase UWA research and its impact on local and global communities.

With over 50 diverse events on offer, it is a great opportunity for you to come and see the sorts of problems we are working on, the connections we have with international researchers and to learn about the cutting-edge facilities we have here.

This year's feature researcher is Professor Jo McDonald, Director Centre for Rock Art Research + Management. During Research Week we will be highlighting her and her team's research in Aboriginal rock art in the Dampier Archipelago in a number of activities in the program.

The week will kick off on Monday 4 September with events in the Research Week marquee, located on Great Court. We are excited to welcome Elders and rangers from the Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation who will be performing and discussing dreamtime stories. As well, we will be joined by Noongar Radio’s 2 Norty Broz who will be broadcasting live from the marquee.

Be part of the live audience and enjoy the atmosphere in what will be a mammoth week of events.

For more information about what’s happening during UWA Research Week and to register for events, visit: www.researchweek.uwa.edu.au.

9:00 - EVENT - Archaeology Seminar Series 2017 : UWA Research Week & CRAR+M Rock Art More Information
UWA Research Week & CRAR+M Rock Art - many events, all welcome (but booking essential)!

From 4-8 September UWA’s Centre for Rock Art Research + Management together with Murujuga and Balanggarra Traditional Owners, Partners and Collaborators is hosting a series of events (below).

Note that for the Monday and Thursday Lectures you must register (links below) as the rooms fill up fast! Hope to see you there!

Event Murujuga – caring for Country’ talk by Murujuga Aboriginal Corporation’s (MAC) Circle of Elders and MAC Rangers who will engage with the audience. 4 September, 10-11 am, Research Week Marquee, Great Court.

Tjaabi performance - By Ngarluma man Patrick Churnside and discussion with UWA Researcher, Andrew Dowding. 4 September, 1:30-2 pm; Marquee, Great Court.

Public Lecture - Ice-Age Visions: a window into the original conservators of WA heritage by Jo McDonald. Monday 4 September 6-7:30 pm, UWA Club. Register at: http://www.researchweek.uwa.edu.au/…/ice-age-visions-a-win…/

Public Lecture - Murujuga: Dynamics of the Dreaming – the latest finds by Murujuga Traditional Owners and UWA archaeologists. Thursday 7th September 4-5 pm Social Sciences Lecture Room 1 (G28). Register at: http://www.researchweek.uwa.edu.au/…/murujuga-dynamics-of-…/

Exhibition - Rio Tinto Indigenous partnerships on research, engagement and heritage management on the Burrup Peninsula. On all week at Reid Library, ground floor – in the centre!

Register for Monday lecture here - http://www.researchweek.uwa.edu.au/…/ice-age-visions-a-win…/ Register for Thursday lecture here - http://www.researchweek.uwa.edu.au/…/murujuga-dynamics-of-…/ Research Week Website here - http://www.researchweek.uwa.edu.au/
Tuesday 05
13:00 - SEMINAR - Xinjiang: One Belt One Road, Mummies and Cultural-Technological Interchange between China and the West More Information
Centre for Muslim States and Societies Seminar Series:

Xinjiang: One Belt One Road, Mummies and Cultural-Technological Interchange between China and the West

Professor Emerita Marika Vicziany, Monash University

China's new economic policy for the development of western China, in particular Xinjiang, now forms part of a national strategy to rejuvenate the old silk roads that have connected China with the rest of the world for thousands of years. Marika Vicziany, will report on her new work in western China from c. 2,000 BCE to the present. Our historical appreciation of the importance of the SILK ROAD begins with the Bronze Age mummies that have been found in the Taklamakan Desert (the mummies are older than 4,000 years ). Today, this region is a true desert but in the past it had many fast flowing rivers, vast poplar trees, much vegetation and people whose naturally mummified remains have been excavated by the Bureau of Cultural Relics. Who were these people? Where did they come from? What happened to their civlisation, given that Bronze Age sites in other parts of Xinjiang continued to thrive? What do the mummies tell us about interactions between China and the West? Professor Vicziany will reflect on the intimate lives of the people of the mummies and how they remind us of ourselves - e.g. they loved tattoos and ugg boots. This illustrated talk will explain the nature of an ARC project between Monash and Sydney Universities, how we are working with Chinese archaeologists in CASS at the central, regional and prefecture levels and our key findings which continue to surprise us as we rewrite the history of the old Silk Roads.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Professor Emerita Marika Vicziany completed her BA Hons in History and Politics at the University of Western Australia in 1969 and then studied in Germany and London from 1969 to 1975, under the prestigious Hackett Scholarship awarded by UWA. In 1975 she completed her doctorate at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Since returning to Australia in 1976 she has published more than a dozen monographs and over 110 academic papers on South Asia and China in addition to various consultancies for the Asian Development Bank/State Council of China, the Australian government, various universities and Australian companies. She has supervised to completion some 25 doctoral students and is currently heading up three research projects about India and two on western China. She has worked in South Asian villages, small towns and cities since 1974 and in western China since 2001.

13:00 - EVENT - Xinjiang: One Belt One Road, Mummies and Cultural-Technological Interchange between China and the West Website | More Information
China's new economic policy for the development of western China, in particular Xinjiang, now forms part of a national strategy to rejuvenate the old silk roads that have connected China with the rest of the world for thousands of years. Marika Vicziany, will report on her new work in western China from c. 2,000 BCE to the present. Our historical appreciation of the importance of the SILK ROAD begins with the Bronze Age mummies that have been found in the Taklamakan Desert (the mummies are older than 4,000 years ). Today, this region is a true desert but in the past it had many fast flowing rivers, vast poplar trees, much vegetation and people whose naturally mummified remains have been excavated by the Bureau of Cultural Relics. Who were these people? Where did they come from? What happened to their civlisation, given that Bronze Age sites in other parts of Xinjiang continued to thrive? What do the mummies tell us about interactions between China and the West? Professor Vicziany will reflect on the intimate lives of the people of the mummies and how they remind us of ourselves - e.g. they loved tattoos and ugg boots. This illustrated talk will explain the nature of an ARC project between Monash and Sydney Universities, how we are working with Chinese archaeologists in CASS at the central, regional and prefecture levels and our key findings which continue to surprise us as we rewrite the history of the old Silk Roads.

Professor Emerita Marika Vicziany completed her BA Hons in History and Politics at the University of Western Australia in 1969 and then studied in Germany and London from 1969 to 1975, under the prestigious Hackett Scholarship awarded by UWA. In 1975 she completed her doctorate at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Since returning to Australia in 1976 she has published more than a dozen monographs and over 110 academic papers on South Asia and China in addition to various consultancies for the Asian Development Bank/State Council of China, the Australian government, various universities and Australian companies. She has supervised to completion some 25 doctoral students and is currently heading up three research projects about India and two on western China. She has worked in South Asian villages, small towns and cities since 1974 and in western China since 2001. Her work is broadly about long term trends in the economic development of Asia, with a special focus on multidisciplinary approaches to understanding the factors that promote and inhibit mass poverty, cultural interchange and the role of technology in historical times and today.

19:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Advances in Cancer Research : Learn about advances in cancer research led by three world-renowned cancer scientists. Website | More Information
Learn about advances in cancer research led by three world-renowned cancer scientists from UWA - Prof Anna Nowak, Prof Bruce Robinson, and Prof Christobel Saunders.
Wednesday 06
13:00 - STAFF EVENT - DEMONSTRATION: Unleashed VR: Soft Skills Training in Virtual Reality : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Virtual Reality (VR) offers all of the benefits of e-learning, including scalability, 24/7 scheduling flexibility and being highly affordable in comparison to paying for the time of live trainers. A unique advantage of VR training is its ability to replicate real-life scenarios in numerous interactive ways. Students build knowledge and confidence in safe and judgment-free environments and apply their knowledge in challenging simulations that are otherwise difficult to re-create.

Perspective-shifting training also gives students an understanding of other's points of view, leading to higher levels of empathy and a better understanding of expected behaviours in the workforce.

VR simulations also capture data that can be analysed to provide personalised feedback to students. This leads to a greater understanding of individual strengths and weaknesses.

Finally, VR is enjoyable and an effective way to engage students to develop their workplace skills in a highly flexible and scalable training environment.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.

16:00 - MOVED READING - Demon's Land (A Modern Adaptation of The Faerie Queene), by Simon Palfrey : Play 2, CMEMS Moved Readings Project Website | More Information
As part of the 'Moved Readings Project', the play will be read on the New Fortune stage with the help of willing students, staff, friends and family. No experience is required, as the readings will take place with script in hand! We hope to provide a dynamic learning space that creates a fun and entertaining experience for anyone who has an interest in early modern drama, acting, theatre studies, or watching colleagues perform outside their comfort zone. Come along and join in!

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Transforming the Lives of Children, Parents and Communities through Positive Parenting: myth or reality? : The 2017 inaugural Robin Winkler Lecture Website | More Information
The 2017 inaugural Robin Winkler lecture by Professor Matthew Sanders, Director, Parenting and Family Support Centre and Professor of Clinical Psychology, The University of Queensland.

This presentation will focus on the critical role of evidence-based parenting programs in the prevention of serious social, emotional and behavioural problems in children and child maltreatment. The impact of parenting on parental and child capacity to self-regulate and its impact on various aspects of development and wellbeing with be discussed. Learnings from large scale population-level implementation of evidence based parenting and family support interventions will be highlighted. The focus will be on the importance of using evidence based interventions, that are culturally informed, and have contemporary relevance to parents in an age of technology. Professor Saunders will attempt to answer the question “What we need to do as a community to shift the needle on child maltreatment and enhance children’s wellbeing at a whole of population level.”

Professor Sanders is considered a world authority on the development, implementation, evaluation, and global dissemination of evidence-based parenting and family intervention programs. He is the founder of the widely acclaimed Triple P-Positive Parenting Program developed under his leadership at the Parenting and Family Support Centre at the University of Queensland.

This lecture commemorates the work of Robin Winkler, a highly influential teacher and researcher whose work was guided by humanitarian values and a relentless questioning of accepted orthodoxies. He died at the age of 43 while heading the UWA clinical masters program at the Psychology Clinic, which now bears his name. In the Oxford Handbook of the History of Psychology he is described as “a singular, crusading figure” in Australian psychology.

This lecture is co-hosted by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the School of Psychological Science.
Thursday 07
7:00 - Health & Wellness - Health Coaching : Free health coaching on campus More Information
Participants needed to assist our 4th year Post Graduate Health students in Health Coaching.

**What’s required from you** 2 sessions of about 1 hour each, 3-4 weeks apart, held at UWA at times convenient to yourself and subject to student availability

**What is Health Coaching?** Health coaching is a methodology that provides person-centred care and promotes health literacy, shared decision-making, behaviour change and self-management to support adherence to evidence-based recommendations for improved health and quality of life outcomes. Topics for coaching can include any health-related issue. During each coaching session students are expected to use the Health Change Australia (HAC) 10-step model for coaching.

**Interested** Contact Jo at epc-sseh@uwa.edu.au Places are limited.

13:30 - EVENT - Medical Research: A Student Perspective : Hear some of our current students discuss their research projects Website | More Information
What is it like to be a Medical student in 2017? We are celebrating the 60th Anniversary of the Medical School, come and hear four of our current students discuss their research projects and learn what it is like to undertake medical research here at UWA.

17:30 - PUBLIC LECTURE - UWA School of Music presents the 2017 Callaway Lecture : Richard Mills AM: Opera in the Mirror of History, Evolution or Extinction More Information
This year, the Institute of Advanced Studies and the School of Music celebrate the 50th anniversary of UWA’s tertiary education partner, West Australian Opera in inviting Dr Richard Mills to deliver the 2017 Callaway Lecture.

Richard Mills was artistic director of West Australian Opera for 15 years between 1997 and 2012 and is one of Australia’s most prolific and internationally recognised composers who pursues a diverse career as a composer, conductor and artistic director.

He has held numerous prestigious posts, and received many scholarships, fellowships and awards including an AM, in 1999. He is currently Artistic Director of Victorian Opera, and has previously been Artistic Director of the West Australian Opera 1997–2012, Director of the Australian Music Project for the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra 2002–2008 and Musica Viva’s Composer of the Year in 2008.

Richard regularly conducts the leading orchestras and opera companies of Australia and has an extensive discography of orchestral works including his own compositions.

In this year’s lecture, Dr Mills will explore contemporary possibilities for the art form of opera, via an analysis of the origins of the art form and an inspection of a sequence of transformatory moments in its history.

Entry is free but please RSVP to concerts@uwa.edu.au

Please join us for refreshments from 5.30pm. Lecture at 6pm
Friday 08
10:00 - EVENT - Psychology in Society Research Week Event : The School of Psychological Science showcases some of its research and its real-world implications Website | More Information
The School of Psychological Science showcases some of its research and its real-world implications. With presentations on face recognition, misinformation and fake news, disaster preparedness, the challenges of automation, treatment of anxiety, and healthy ageing.

11:00 - EVENT - SHOWCASE: Ruby the Robot : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Ruby is a NAO robot, NAO is the world’s leading and most widely used humanoid robot for education, healthcare, and research. NAO is 58cm tall, autonomous, and fully programmable robot that can walk, talk and listen. Meet Ruby, see what she can do and explore the problem solving required when coding and opportunities to use Robots in learning and teaching.

Many have seen her guiding and touring through the Futures Observatory and now after more work from our Computer Science students we have enabled more of her functionality and designed new code for her better interact with humans. Some of her new abilities include:

THE RED BALL: Explore with Ruby the problem solving required to manoeuvre obstacles using her feet sensors and cameras located on her body. Then work with her to interact and play with a red ball aiming to shoot a goal, and hearing her interactivity as she recognises either a hit or miss.

WHO AM I: Have a conversation with Ruby as she learns to recognise your face and has a personalised conversation with you. Demonstrating her facial recognition technology and ability to transform a conversation with her artificial intelligence you can engage with the future of soft skills that all artificial intelligent robots will possess.

SIMON SAYS: Watch Ruby follow instructions you give her as she replicates the movements spoken. By interacting in this way, you can see her 25 degrees of freedom and dexterity from her fingers, showing humanoid movements a robot can perform that you have never seen before!

We will have some of our students present during these events to talk about the challenges and successes they had in the project and their foray into a career in coding and robotics.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.

14:30 - SEMINAR - The phantom national? Using an ‘assemblage analytic’ to understand national schooling reforms More Information
In this seminar, Dr. Glenn Savage will draw upon an emerging body of research on ‘policy assemblage’ within the fields of policy sociology, anthropology and critical geography, to consider how an assemblage analytic might help researchers better understand national schooling reforms in an era marked by increasingly transnational policy mobilities. He will begin by outlining core foundations of an assemblage analytic that make it generative for analysing complex policy formations. He will then use the development of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (APST) as an illustrative case, to show how this particular national reform has evolved from complex and uneven interactions between diverse policy ideas, practices, actors and organisations. He will argue that while reforms like the APST claim to be national in form and scope, ‘the national’ is better understood as a disjunctive and phantom-like assemblage of heterogeneous parts, which reflect strong transnational traits and impulses. This has implications for researchers seeking to understand national schooling policies in unitary and federal systems alike, especially in an era in which standards-based reforms are touted globally as policy solutions to a host of apparent dilemmas in schooling policy and beyond. Bio: Dr. Glenn C. Savage is a Senior Lecturer in Public Policy and Sociology of Education at the University of Western Australia. His current research examines how schooling policies in federal systems are mediated by transnational flows of policy ideas and practices. He currently holds an Australian Research Council ‘Discovery Early Career Researcher Award’ (DECRA) titled ‘National schooling reform and the reshaping of Australian federalism’ (2016-2019).

17:00 - Free Lecture Recital - UWA School of Music Presents Fridays@Five : Adam Pinto: Smalley Arranged Website | More Information
Now in its third season, Fridays@Five is the ideal way to kick-start your weekend! Each session offers a unique musical experience to delight all music lovers, from young artist led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind the scenes workshops to lectures and masterclasses. Join us each week for a delightful musical surprise!

Presented as part of UWA research Week

Adam Pinto: Smalley Arranged

Join Adam Pinto and special guest artists in performances, and detailed discussion of performance practice and rehearsal techniques. The afternoon will be focussed on performances and arrangements related to Roger Smalley's award winning composition, his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra.

Free entry - no bookings required.
Monday 11
14:00 - STAFF EVENT - WORKSHOP: Design Augmented Reality Experiences Using Aurasma : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Aurasma is an augmented reality platform which could potentially change the way you interact with the real world. Recent UWA TechNode surveys at UWA indicate that most students have a mobile device. Given this, Aurasma opens up opportunities in an instructional and educational manner, as the need for more detailed information exists in a physical space or document where a mobile device with wifi is available. For example, once pointed at printed documents, static physical places, or objects with augmented markers, mobile devices can discover information such as videos, animations, weblinks or 3D objects that are woven into the fabric of the real world by using Aurasma.

This hands-on workshop will take 45 minutes. You will get the opportunity to experience augmented reality examples as a learner using the Aurasma App and also create a basic AR experience using the Aurasma App. We will also demonstrate the Basic Free Aurasma Studio platform that enables you to create more complex auras with more functionality.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Coping with Grief and Loss: ancient and modern perspectives Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Han Baltussen, the Walter Watson Hughes Professor of Classics, University of Adelaide and UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

In this lecture Professor Baltussen will explore the rich repertoire of grief experiences from antiquity in an attempt to understand how humans have coped with loss and bereavement since the beginnings of Western literature.

If grief is a universal marker of humanity, these ancient experiences should resonate with us today. Given the renewed interest in the process of mourning, privately and publicly, it is also worthwhile considering whether the ancient coping strategies have any lessons to offer, in particular through the power of words (written or spoken). Modern bereavement advice tends to allow for a great variety of approaches, from rational evaluation to creative expression. Professor Baltussen will ask whether ancient grief practices could contribute anything to this emerging area of the ‘healing arts’.
Tuesday 12
13:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Is it OK to remove statues? : A 'Talking Allowed' event Website | More Information
With Associate Professor Clarissa Ball, Discipline Chair, History of Art, UWA School of Design, Director, UWA Institute of Advanced Studies.

The recent removal of Confederate statues in the United States has resulted in extraordinary acts of violence, heightened racial tensions and death. Debate continues to rage about whether or not the removal of public statues is akin to erasing the past and “changing history”, as President Trump put it. Is Trump right, or is the truth far more complex?

Closer to home, debate is mounting about Australia’s colonial monuments. Stan Grant’s statement that the inscription on the statue of James Cook in Sydney’s Hyde Park “maintains a damaging myth” has been met with astonishing claims. One commentator has gone so far as to liken Grant’s questioning of the statue’s plaque and its doctrine of discovery to the cultural destruction of the Taliban Left.

Join us for this Talking Allowed to consider what it is about statues that render them the focus of struggle and to explore some of the complexities that surround their removal or modification.

‘Talking Allowed’ is a new series of presentations offered by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

On the second Tuesday of every month, a UWA academic will give a short presentation on a topic of current relevance to the arts and culture before inviting the audience to participate in discussion and debate.

‘Talking Allowed’ is designed to be thought-provoking, challenging, stimulating and engaging. Come along and join the dialogue on matters that are of great importance to our society.

18:00 - PERFORMANCE - Zhejiang Art Academy Performance : Contemporary performance with spectacular dance, exceptional music and traditional Chinese instruments, drawing from centuries of Chinese history and folklore. Website | More Information
To celebrate Confucius Institute Day and the 30th anniversary of the Sister State relationship between Western Australia and Zhejiang Province, the Confucius Institute at UWA presents a very special performance by the Zhejiang Art Academy - one of China’s most highly regarded performance institutions and a training ground for China’s future stars.

This contemporary performance will feature spectacular dance, exceptional music and traditional Chinese instruments, drawing from centuries of Chinese history and folklore.

There will also be a surprise take on one of our Australian rock classics.

This is the Academy’s first visit to Australia and is exclusive to Perth.

Tickets $10 Adult/ $5 Concession / $25 Family

Book at http://www.ticketswa.com/event/zhejiang-art-academy

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