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Today's date is Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Events for the public
 May 2017
Monday 22
19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Main Stage : Sensation Website | More Information
The exceptional ability of young emerging artists and their passion for music will always create an extraordinary experience for concertgoers. In 2017 four outstanding orchestral and choral concerts will feature Western Australia’s finest young musicians.

The exceptional ability of our young emerging artists is celebrated as three young performers compete in the finals of the prestigious VOSE Concerto Competition. To complete the program the UWA Symphony Orchestra will be joined on stage by the Symphonic Chorus of UWA and talented school choristers to present Stravinsky’s masterpiece Symphony of Psalms.

VOSE Memorial Prize Finalists Nielson Concerto for Flute and Orchestra - Megan Barbetti (Flute) Abe Prism Rhapsody - Jet Kye Chong (Marimba) Shostakovich Cello Concerto No. 1 - Jeremy Garside (Cello)

Stravinsky Symphony of Psalms

Tickets Standard $25 Concession $20 Friends of UWA School of Music $18

Website Bookings: www.perthconcerthall.com.au Phone Bookings: Perth Concert Hall Box Office 9231 9999 In Person: Perth Concert Hall Box Office Mon – Fri 9.00am – 5.00pm
Tuesday 23
13:00 - STAFF EVENT - Multi-Modal Feedback: New Ways to Engage Students and Enhance their Learning Experience : Presentation Website | More Information
Interested in learning about multi-modal feedback? Now is the time!

Research indicates that written, audio and video feedback on assessments results in a positive impact on engagement, performance and overall perception of the unit and its coordinator.

In this session you will have the opportunity to:

*examine how feedback methods intersect with UWA’s new assessment policy,

*review the results of some recent Australia studies investigating the provision of multi-modal feedback on staff and students,

*learn more about how the Centre for Education Futures strategic “Shooting Stars” Initiative aims to enable staff to adopt new feedback methods, and

*explore possible workflows for integrating audio and video with written feedback, enabling you to provide more feedback in less time.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link below.

13:00 - SEMINAR - Political Science and International Relations Seminar Series 2017 : Apocalypse now? Donald Trump and East Asia. More Information
No one knows what the unexpected election of Donald Trump will mean for the broadly conceived Asia-Pacific region. What we do know, however, is that it is likely to be very different from what has gone before. At the very least it will draw a line under Obama’s ‘Pivot’ to Asia and to specific initiatives like the Trans Pacific Partnership. The familiar basis of US regional engagement that has been in place for half a century may be replaced by a more ‘transactional’ approach to foreign policy that places ‘America’s national interest’ ahead of all others. This presentation considers what this may mean for East Asia in particular by considering some of the deeply integrated geopolitical and geo-economic dynamics that currently drive regional relations, but which seem to have been given little consideration by the incoming administration.
Wednesday 24
17:30 - EVENT - Blood-Injury-Injection Phobia Group Treatment Group : A group treatment program run at UWA for people with fears related to blood, injury or injections Website | More Information
Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia (BIIP) is a fear triggered by blood, an injury,or by receiving an injection or other invasive medical procedure. People with BIIP vary in their reactions and may feel disgust, nausea, dizziness or even faint.

The Robin Winker Clinic will be running a group treatment program for BIIP under the supervision of Associate Professor Carmela Pestell. It will run for 7 two-hour sessions as well as an initial assessment and a follow-up session.

Through this program, individuals will work in a supportive, confidential environment to challenge their fears and learn coping strategies for anxiety and to prevent fainting or feelings of disgust.
Thursday 25
12:00 - EVENT - The Friends of Grounds of UWA Plant Sale : A large selection of succulents, exotics, natives and herbs for sale. More Information
Our last sale sold out before 2pm. Any remaining plants will be sold on Friday 26th May at 12 - 2pm. We have a large selection of succulents as well as exotics, natives and herbs. Most plants will be $3-$5 with most herbs less. It is cash only and bring your own bag/box if possible. All proceeds will be spent on the grounds of UWA.

16:00 - EVENT - CMSS Seminar Series: The Saudi State as an Identity Racketeer Website | More Information
CMSS Religion, State and Society Seminar Series:

"The Saudi State as an Identity Racketeer"

Although substantial research has examined the Saudi state’s symbiosis with the Islamic revivalist movement commonly known as ‘Wahhabism’, few studies have considered how the dynamics of state formation underpin this relationship. This paper argues that a continuous and circular political logic lies behind the Saudi state’s patronage of the revivalist movement since 1744 and proposes a four-stage model that explains how and why the regime has maintained its support for the revivalist movement over such a prolonged period. The presentation first outlines the model, then presents a detailed analysis of its persistent presence in the development of Saudi state authority in order to highlight the recurrent manner by which the state often has constructed the spiritual concerns of revivalists to counter challenges to its authority, a pattern demonstrated most recently during the Arab Spring and the war in Yemen. The effects of this model will continue to shape the decisions, policies and perceptions of the Saudi political elite for the foreseeable future.

Dr. Ben Rich focuses his research on Middle Eastern affairs, political violence and international relations. He researches Saudi affairs, military policy and power politics in the Persian Gulf, as well as a range of topics relating to terrorism and insurgency.

16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series 2017 : Livelihoods, Fire Regimes, and Novel Ecosystems in Indigenous Australia and Investigating Dingaal Seascapes on the Great Barrier Reef, Far North Queensland More Information
Livelihoods, Fire Regimes, and Novel Ecosystems in Indigenous Australia

We are currently experiencing what Elizabeth Kolbert calls the planet's sixth great extinction. Australia represents the largest contributor to the mammalian component of this catastrophe. This presentation explores extinction processes in the most remote parts of Australia’s Western Desert with analyses of ecological interactions mediated in Aboriginal livelihoods. I investigate contemporary and historic relationships among invasive species, disturbance regimes, and Aboriginal land use, especially those associated with patterns of anthropogenic fire and their role in facilitating fundamental trophic interactions. These analyses suggest that, especially with increasingly variable climatic conditions, the efficacy of conservation and habitat restoration throughout much of the arid zone will likely depend on land management prescriptions modelled on Indigenous fire regimes.

Investigating Dingaal Seascapes on the Great Barrier Reef, Far North Queensland

Jiigurru or Lizard Island is a continental island on the Great Barrier Reef 250km north of Cairns and 30km from the mainland. The archipelago of islands forming an arc between Jiigurru and Cape Flattery on the mainland are traditionally owned by Dingaal people. The island is tightly enmeshed in a long and complex history of trade and exchange along the western margin of the Coral Sea which remains poorly understood. Dingaal country has also been at the centre of a sometimes violent recent history extending from Cook’s visit in 1770 and including the death of Mary Watson in 1881 and subsequent retributive killings. A richly storied cultural landscape including Dingaal histories, stone arrangements, shell middens, rock art and 19th and 20th century sites allow us to begin to engage with aspects of these histories in association with Dingaal. Here we outline preliminary results of a new phase of archaeological research on Lizard Island that commenced in 2012.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Fisheries and Global Warming: Impacts on marine ecosystems : Professor Daniel Pauly takes a historical look at fisheries, and comments on the current challenges of global food security Website | More Information
The period following the Second World War saw a massive increase in fishing effort, particularly in the 1960s. However, crashes due to this overfishing began to be reflected in global catch trends in the 1970s, and intensified in the 1980s and 1990s. In response, the industrialised countries of the Northern Hemisphere (where over fishing-induced catch declines appeared first) moved their effort toward deeper waters, and toward the south, i.e., to the coasts of developing countries, and beyond into the southern hemisphere, all the way to Antarctica. Now, in the second decade of the 21st century, the global expansion of fisheries is completed, and the real global catch, which is much higher than officially reported, peaked in the late 1980s and is now rapidly declining. In parallel, the collateral damage to marine ecosystems and biodiversity continues to increase. Several factors act to prevent the public in developed countries from realising the depth of the crisis fisheries are in, notably the increased imports by developed countries, of seafood from developing countries. Also, the misleading perception that aquaculture can substitute for declining catches is widespread. In some countries, notably the U.S., stocks are being rebuilt, but elsewhere, the failure to respond creatively to these clear trends bode ill for the next decades. Indeed, the effects of global warming (productivity declines in the tropics, widespread disruptions at high latitudes), which have been increasingly felt in the last decades, will strongly impact fisheries and global seafood supply.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Fisheries and Global Warming: Impacts on marine ecosystems : Public Lecture by Daniel Pauly Website | More Information
A public lecture by Professor Daniel Pauly, fisheries expert and marine conservationist

In this public lecture, Professor Pauly takes a historical look at fisheries, and comments on the current challenges of global food security.

The period following the Second World War saw a massive increase in fishing effort, particularly in the 1960s. However, crashes due to this overfishing began to be reflected in global catch trends in the 1970s, and intensified in the 1980s and 1990s. In response, the industrialised countries of the Northern Hemisphere (where overfishing-induced catch declines appeared first) moved their effort toward deeper waters, and toward the south, i.e., to the coasts off developing countries, and beyond into the southern hemisphere, all the way to Antarctica.

Now, in the second decade of the 21st century, the global expansion of fisheries is completed, and the real global catch, which is much higher than officially reported, peaked in the late 1980s and is now rapidly declining. In parallel, the collateral damage to marine ecosystems and biodiversity continues to increase. Several factors act to prevent the public in developed countries from realising the depth of the crisis fisheries are in, notably the increased imports by developed countries, of seafood from developing countries. Also, the misleading perception that aquaculture can substitute for declining catches is widespread. In some countries, notably the U.S., stocks are being rebuilt, but elsewhere, the failure to respond creatively to these clear trends bode ill for the next decades. Indeed, the effects of global warming (productivity declines in the tropics, widespread disruptions at high latitudes), which have been increasingly felt in the last decades, will strongly impact fisheries and global seafood supply.
Friday 26
12:00 - EVENT - Linguistics Seminar Semester one 2017 : Expressing compassion with intonation in languages of central Arnhem Land More Information
Join Maïa Ponsonnet, from the University of Sydney, as she explores compassion in Indigenous languages. A number of Indigenous languages in the Top End display a highly conventionalised intonation contour that is used in emotionally tinted contexts relating in particular to compassion.

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Free Lunchtime Concert : UWA Guitar Studio Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday in our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the finest musical talent locally, nationally and within the School.

Under the direction of Dr Jonathan Fitzgerald, the UWA Guitar Studio perform a selection of works for solo, duo and ensemble in this intimate free concert.

Entry is free, no bookings required.

15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - John Public As We See Him: Returning Authoritative Perspectives on “Midgets”, Science and Depression-era Show Audiences : Public Talk with Guy Kirkwood Website | More Information
Buddie Thompson, a self-described ‘midget’ with a penchant for studying his fellow human beings (both ‘little’ and ‘big’), navigated complex and competing conceptualisations of what being short-statured signified in the Depression-era United States. In these years the American ‘Freak Show’ no longer held the same widespread popular appeal it had had prior to the beginning of the century, while the discourses of medical science, reflecting the height of the eugenics movement as well as recent developments in the new field of endocrinology, intersected to make for particularly dangerous ground for those with ‘extraordinary bodies’. Thompson, and other ‘little people’ had career options which expanded beyond the increasingly moralised ‘freak show’, to traveling ‘midget troupes’, ‘Liliputian’ operatic companies, and miniature sized ‘midget city’ exhibits at World’s Fairs, but these involved no less fraught performative styles of self-representation.

By closely analysing Buddie Thompson’s insider account of little person show performers, As I Know Them: A Midget’s Story of Show People, self-published in 1936, I will examine how Thompson developed a unique and authoritative perspective which engaged in the complex and competing discourses of both popular culture and medical science. Thompson specifically rejected the social authority of medical physicians and their advice on new experimental hormone treatments, but only by professing to a superior scientific knowledge of the functioning of ‘glands of internal secretion’. He also rejected popular and offensive ‘outsider’ accounts of ‘midget’ show life offered by journalists which traded in obscenity and perverse interest, while nonetheless retaining countless anecdotes which played upon stereotypes of prodigious (but nonetheless ‘healthy’) male midget sexuality. Most importantly, Thompson devoted large parts of his narrative to returning gaze upon ‘John Public’ himself/herself, making his audience and readers the target of a close sociological and psychological study typically reserved for those with supposedly pathological or non-normative bodies. While Thompson lived until 1968, his relatively short show career, which appears to have finished before the end of the 1930s but included involvement in important historical moments like the Chicago Century of Progress World’s Fair, spoke to the increasingly difficulties of self-exhibition for small-statured people as a potentially empowering and profitable occupation supplanted and specifically rejected by the more recognisable minority-modelled organisations such as the Little People of America.

Guy Kirkwood is a PhD student at The University of Western Australia whose research focuses on late 19th and early 20th century American 'freak shows'. His working thesis aims to locate the perspectives and performance strategies of specific individuals within different historical and cultural moments, as well as within distinct regimes of normalisation. He has also taught some second and third year units at UWA, focusing broadly on African American history, as well as American colonialism. Guy hopes to finish his PhD at the end of the year and to have the opportunity to pursue future projects in the 'sideshow' of academia.

15:00 - SEMINAR - ANTHROPOLOGY / SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR SERIES, SEMESTER 1, 2017 : Rethinking Altered States of Consciousness in a Transforming World: Could Psychedelics be Vehicles for Change? More Information
Rethinking Altered States of Consciousness in a Transforming World: Could Psychedelics be Vehicles for Change? by Alicia Wheatley

The recent renaissance into the study of psychedelic substances raises interesting and conceptually important issues for anthropologists and other academics alike. My data explore how altered states of consciousness (ASC), as opposed to the typical waking state, can offer significant benefits to those who experience them. As such, a preliminary objective of this thesis has been to explore the motivations and intentions behind psychedelic use by Westerners. By focusing mostly on entheogenic use, this study is interested in how Western users' worldviews, values, and practices are transformed through their use of psychedelics. From these results, I offer the notion that psychedelics are potential tools for correcting damaging human behaviours from further contributing to the impending ecological crisis. By delving into alternative epistemological methods of analysing psychedelic experiences, I additionally make the case that anthropologists must address the challenges and limitations of Western hegemonic perspectives, in order to respectably explore alternate ways of ‘knowing’ and ‘being’ in the 21st century.

Treading on the Glass Ceiling in Stilettos : A 21st Century Gender Equality (lack of) Progress Report by Nathan Jakovich

As the so-called ‘2nd wave’ of feminism audaciously broke through into (Western) mainstream consciousness throughout the 1960s and 1970s, there was widespread optimism that future gender equality was both attainable and inevitable. This thesis investigates why these predictions have not come to fruition. This study begins by presenting key achievements and theoretical developments in the ‘wave metaphor’ of feminism. It also addresses limitations of this view of feminist history, particularly the notion of ‘hegemonic feminism’, which asserts that much of feminist history and theory (particularly the consolidation and influence of traditional western liberal feminism that occurred during the 2nd wave) was produced from a perspective that was ‘privileged and white’ and is thus largely inapplicable to working-class women and ‘women of color’. The key theoretical focus for this discussion is the idea of a ‘patriarchal gender regime’, developed from Foucault’s concept of societal ‘regimes of truth’. It shows how the operation of patriarchal power is reinforced across generations, a major contributing factor to the concerningly slow rate that the gender gap is closing. I suggest the current appropriateness of intersectional feminism as a sound theoretical framework with which to address the historical materialist and culturally symbolic gender inequities that continue to be perpetrated/perpetuated across the world. I utilise categorical bifurcations including west/east, 1st/3rd world and religious/secular in addition to race, class and age to illustrate how ‘compound discrimination’ can occur across each of these dimensions and how they interact with gender to produce vastly inequitable life outcomes depending on a woman’s ‘glocality’. Finally I propose strategies for speeding up progress towards gender equality.

17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Fridays@5 : Student Takeover: Mostly Marimba (Pinata Percussion) Website | More Information
Now in its third season, Fridays@Five is the ideal way to kick-start your weekend! Each session offers a unique musical experience to delight all music lovers, from young artist led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind the scenes workshops to lectures and masterclasses.

This week, UWA's talented Percussion students present a celebration of tuned percussion music. This showcase of marimba repertoire, techniques and approaches will feature works by Keiko Abe, George Hamilton Green, Ross Edwards, Eric Sammut, Samuel Barber and more.

Entry is free, no bookings required.
Monday 29
19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents: Enrich! : World Percussion Carnival Website | More Information
The School of Music offers a number of stimulating and enjoyable broadening units for all undergraduates studying at UWA. Enrich! brings together these students in vibrant and dynamic ensemble performances.

In the World Percussion Carnival, Head of Percussion Louise Devenish will lead 3 ensembles in a lively performance of traditional Zimbabwean, Zulu and West African music!

Come and hear part of the wealth of musical talent on campus!

Tickets (available at the door): $10 Standard | $5 Concessions (Seniors/Children/Students/Friends of Music)
Tuesday 30
13:00 - SEMINAR - Human skeletal remains associated with the mutiny of the VOC Retourschip Batavia, 1629: preliminary findings of the 2015/2016 field season : School of Human Sciences (APHB) Seminar Series Website | More Information
The Seminar: On 4 June 1629, the Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC) retourschip Batavia wrecked on Morning Reef, in the Houtman Abrolhos, approximately 65 km off the Western Australian coast. The macabre events following the wrecking saw more than 100 individuals murdered over a three-month period, by mutineers attempting to subjugate surviving crew and passengers. The historical significance of the latter is well established, and has been reconstructed, through the analysis of an extensive archaeological record, both maritime and terrestrial. With specific reference to known discoveries of human skeletal remains, four individual burials were recovered on Beacon Island between 1960 to 1964; a further six individuals were recovered from a multiple grave that was excavated in stages between 1994 and 2001. A multi-disciplinary collaboration of national and international partners performed a remote sensing program involving magnetics and conductivity mapping and GPR profiling followed by a series of targeted excavations on Beacon Island in January and February of 2015, and November 2016; this included the excavation of the recently rediscovered location of the postcranial remains of a skull originally removed in 1964, in addition to excavations in the southern region of the island where a human molar was found 2013. The latter discovery proved fortuitous, with the excavation culminating in the discovery of an intact human burial at over one meter in depth. Further excavation in the area to the immediate north led to the discovery of a further two individuals buried in direct association, one on top of the other. In 2016 a further individual was found, along with ceramics. The aim of the present presentation is to briefly describe the skeletal remains of the 2015-16 field season, including their burial context, and preliminary analyses of their demographics (sex, age and stature), including descriptions of potential palaeopathology.

The Speaker: Daniel Franklin has an honours degree in bioarchaeology and a PhD in physical anthropology. He is currently an Associate Professor at the Centre for Forensic Anthropology, School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia. His research involves the validation and exploration of alternative approaches for the quantification of skeletal biology and to advocate its potential applications in the forensic sciences. He has published extensively in a variety of journals, most recently in the Journal of Forensic Sciences; Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology; American Journal of Physical Anthropology; and the International Journal of Legal Medicine.

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - Sufi Songs from the Pankisi Valley by the Ensemble Aznash Lamaan Website | More Information
Denmark Arts and the Centre for Muslim States and Societies, UWA, invite you to Sufi Songs from the Pankisi Valley by the Ensemble Aznash Lamaan.

The Ensemble Aznash Laaman are a collective of ethnic Chechen musicians from Georgia. For the Aznash Laaman there is the root, the vibration common to all, carried by the songs. It is joy and wealth for all beings.

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents: Enrich! : Percussion Fiesta Website | More Information
The School of Music offers a number of stimulating and enjoyable broadening units for all undergraduates studying at UWA. Enrich! brings together these students in vibrant and dynamic ensemble performances.

The Percussion Fiesta will feature over 80 students, performing pieces from film and TV, Pop and Rock favourites as well as more traditional African melodies in the culmination of their semester's work!

Come and hear part of the wealth of musical talent on campus!

Tickets (available at the door): $10 Standard | $5 Concessions (Seniors/Children/Students/Friends of Music)
Wednesday 31
16:00 - STAFF EVENT - Futures Enthusiasts Meet-Up (FEMU) for May 2017 : Futures Enthusiasts are people who are keen to be a part of the next wave of developments in higher education using technology and concepts to innovate learning and teaching practices. Website | More Information
Come along to the next Futures Enthusiasts Meet-Up (FEMU) event on Wednesday, 31 May 2017 between 4-5pm to meet, share ideas and team up with other education futures enthusiasts from the UWA community, Perth start-ups, industry or technology specialists.

The FEMU event for May will feature a presentation by Dr Michael Ovens on Virtual Reality in Higher Education. Followed by a Networking Session.

Virtual Reality is considered by some to be a replacement for traditional face-to-face teaching methods, and a poor one at that. This presentation by Dr Michael Ovens, a recent Humanities doctoral graduate and educational Virtual Reality developer, will contest this position by arguing that Virtual Reality can be used to enhance rather than replace traditional teaching if educators and designers focus on the three things Virtual Reality does best: immersion, interaction, and impossibility.

Virtual Reality experiences will be made available for trial on the Futures Observatory's HTC Vive device.

Register for this FEMU event via the Eventbrite link below.

19:30 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents: Enrich! : Rhythm & Beats Website | More Information
The School of Music offers a number of stimulating and enjoyable broadening units for all undergraduates studying at UWA. Enrich! brings together these students in vibrant and dynamic ensemble performances.

Rhythm & Beats will feature the Latin/Junk Percussion Ensemble, performing traditional pieces such as a Samba Batucada alongside new sounds of AfroJunk.

The concert will also feature Al On Quintet, a student led ensemble, who will present a program entitled Persian Art Music in Perspective.

Come and hear part of the wealth of musical talent on campus!

Tickets (available at the door): $10 Standard | $5 Concessions (Seniors/Children/Students/Friends of Music)

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