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Today's date is Sunday, July 23, 2017
Events for the public
 May 2017
Monday 01
17:00 - FREE LECTURE - CMSS Public Lecture: Sharia in Islam - What it is, and what it is not Website | More Information
CMSS Public Lecture:

Shari'a in Islam: what it is, and what it is not.

Date: Monday, 1 May 2017 Time: 5pm to 6.30pm Venue: Austin Lecture Hall, 159, Arts Building, UWA. Entry: Free RSVP: via Eventbrite or email to cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au

In this lecture Dr Khalid Zaheer will focus on common misconceptions about Shari'a and explain what Shari'a is and is not, with concrete historical and contemporary examples.

Dr Khalid Zaheer is a student of the prominent Islamic scholar Javed Ahmad Ghamidi of Pakistan. Zaheer's doctorate from University of Wales (1994) was a critique of Islamic banking. He taught Islamic studies and Islamic ethics in business in Lahore University of Management Sciences from 1996 to 2006. He was the Dead of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences in the University of Central Punjab from 2009 to 2012. He is currently a Fellow of Al-Mawrid, an institute for Islamic education and research in Pakistan.
Tuesday 02
8:00 - CONFERENCE - Science on The Swan 2017: One Health : Science on the Swan, WA's annual premier health and medical research conference Website | More Information
One Health seeks root cause understanding and effective solutions to emergent infectious and acquired diseases through, fundamental stem cell and regenerative medical science, public health and environmental remedies, working synergistically to advance the health of all species and the varied places in which they live. The conference and associated workshops provide an opportunity to interact with global research leaders in this important 21st century field. The program includes internationally recognised speakers and many of Australia’s top One Health researchers working in partnership with industry to deliver effective health outcomes for our planet. Please go to http://scienceontheswan.com.au/ for registration.

8:00 - CONFERENCE - Science on The Swan 2017: One Health : Science on the Swan, WA’s annual premier health and medical research conference Website | More Information
One Health seeks root cause understanding and effective solutions to emergent infectious and acquired diseases through, fundamental stem cell and regenerative medical science, public health and environmental remedies, working synergistically to advance the health of all species and the varied places in which they live. The conference and associated workshops provide an opportunity to interact with global research leaders in this important 21st century field. The program includes internationally recognised speakers and many of Australia’s top One Health researchers working in partnership with industry to deliver effective health outcomes for our planet. Please go to http://scienceontheswan.com.au/ for registration. Early Bird expires 24th April 2017
Thursday 04
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series 2017 : From Barges to Gentlemen's Yachts: The archaeology of the Port of Perth 1830-1900 More Information
In 2011 Dr Gaye Nayton gave a public talk at the “More than grass – Exploring the Esplanade” conference, organised by the History Council of Western Australia. Dr Nayton’s talk was entitled “Foreshore treasure: The potential archaeology of the buried Port of Perth” where she stated that while the “Parks themselves have their own archaeology associated with leisure activities since they were created … in the case of the foreshore parks there is a whole different landscape buried deep underneath them”. Two recent consultancy excavation and monitoring programmes at the Supreme Court Garden and Elizabeth Quay have proved Dr Nayton correct. The seminar will discuss recent archaeological evidence from the construction of the first jetty in 1830 through to the eventual burying of both the Reveley and Barrack St Jetties under landfill by 1900. The changing Port of Perth landscape and its resultant impact on the archaeology will also be discussed.
Friday 05
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Free Lunchtime Concert : UWA Winds Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday in our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the finest musical talent locally, nationally and within the School.

Entry is free, no bookings required.

17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Fridays@5 : Student Takeover: Dekleva, Tchaikovsky & Thalberg Website | More Information
Now in its third season, Fridays@Five is the ideal way to kick-start your weekend! Each session offers a unique musical experience to delight all music lovers, from young artist led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind the scenes workshops to lectures and masterclasses. Join us each week for a delightful musical surprise!

Sigismond Thalberg – Grand Caprice sur des motifs de 'La Sonnambula', op.46 (solo piano) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Selections from the Nutcracker Suite (two pianos) James Dekleva – 'Winter and Spring' (mezzo-soprano and piano) James Dekleva – Piano Trio no.1 in D major (piano trio)
Sunday 07
14:30 - CONCERT - Sea Symphony : University of Western Australia Choral Society Website | More Information
Sea Symphony, composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams and inspired by Walt Whitman’s magnificent poetry, depicts the majesty and mystery of the sea. Composed between 1903 and 1909, it was the composer’s first and longest choral work. Sea Symphony superbly evokes the power of the sea and celebrates the brave explorers who navigate its waters, whilst also using the sea as a metaphor for a voyage into eternity. Hear this ambitious and bold masterpiece brought to life by a choir of over 100 singers, including two outstanding Australian soloists, Katja Webb and Andrew Foote, with a full orchestra conducted by Christopher van Tuinen.

Tickets can be purchased online via http://ticketswa.com/event/sea-symphony or at the door. Prices: $45 and $40 (concession)

16:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Keyed Up! : Next Generation - Shuan Hern Lee Website | More Information
International award winner Shuan Hern Lee is a remarkable young pianist, with skill and musicianship beyond his years. In 2017 Shuan begins his undergraduate studies at UWA at the age of just 14. We welcome him to UWA with a very special concert where he will perform works by Chopin, Prokofiev and Vine.

PROGRAM Shuan Hern Lee - Mobile Thematic Madness Bach - Chromatic Fantasie and Fugue in D minor BWV 903 Chopin - Sonata no. 2 Op. 35 Prokofiev - Toccata Op. 11 Chopin - Ballad no. 2 Op. 38 Schumann - Sonata Op. 22 Balakirev - Islamey Vine - Toccassimo

Tickets Standard $20 Concessions $18 Friends of Music $15 trybooking.com/OWRJ
Tuesday 09
13:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Talking Allowed: Seeing Allowed? : Professor Jane Lydon (Wesfarmers Chair of Australian History) will speak to a number of issues that surround images of suffering. While it would seem that in 2017 photographs and images are becoming central to socio-political and ideological tensions, Professor Lydon will explore whether or not real change can be wrought by harrowing images of suffering. Website | More Information
Over the last two years and with the rise of the citizen photographer, there have been radical changes in how we respond to photographs and images, particularly those that reveal unimaginable suffering. Whether it is a photograph of the lifeless body of Aylan Kurdi washed ashore near the Turkish resort of Bodrum, the images of Dylan Voller spit-hooded and shackled to a restraint chair, or the photograph of the Muslim woman amidst the carnage on Westminster Bridge, images appear to have acquired a new status in their capacity to prompt indignation and action. Which images can we say have changed the course of history? And what makes an image powerful at a particular moment? In her talk ‘Seeing Allowed?’, Professor Jane Lydon (Wesfarmers Chair of Australian History) will speak to a number of issues that surround images of suffering. While it would seem that in 2017 photographs and images are becoming central to socio-political and ideological tensions, Professor Lydon will explore whether or not real change can be wrought by harrowing images of suffering.

17:00 - LECTURE - Countering Violent Extremism in Africa More Information
Centre for Muslim States and Societies and UWA Africa Research Cluster invite you to a public lecture on

"Countering Violent Extremism in Africa"

by His Excellency Ambassador Prof. Julius Kibet Bitok, PhD, Kenya High Commissioner to Pakistan

In this lecture, Professor Bitok will discuss and assess the experiences and policies for countering violent extremism in Africa, through perspectives from both his own academic and institutional backgrounds.

About the speaker

Amb. Prof. Julius Kibet Bitok has had a distinguished career in Public Service sparing over 15 years covering a broad spectum of assignments. He combines in-depth expertise and experience drawn from a cross-section of engagements in public service, diplomatic service, research and academia in Kenya and abroad. He rose through the ranks in Moi University from tutorial fellow to the highest level of Associate proffessor of Finance. He later served as the Dean of faculty of Commerce in the Cooperative University of Kenya. He also served as a technical advisor on finance matters to the presidency in Kenya.
Wednesday 10
17:00 - FREE LECTURE - Dance Dance Evolution: How humans found their groove Website | More Information
Humans are really good at moving in time. Our knack for rhythmic synchronisation sets us apart from much of the animal world, aside from a few notable exceptions (parrots, sea lions, dolphins and possibly some other primates). Evolution is a tough business, and specialised cognitive abilities tend not to survive for long without a purpose. So, why can we dance? The answer may be in how we socialise.

Through this talk, I will explore contemporary theories which aim to explain the evolution of music and dance in terms of the social needs of our species. Coordinated, synchronised activity makes us like each other more, and may serve to bind groups together. Studies by myself and others are now trying to identify the neural-cognitive mechanisms involved in this synchrony-bonding effect, using a variety of methods: from motion capture to hormonal measurements.

In a world that is increasingly divided, understanding ways in which humans have traditionally bound groups together has never been more important. If we developed a capacity for rhythmic synchronisation as a mechanism for building positive feelings of affiliation between individuals in large social groups, then we would do well to learn from our ancestors and remember how to boogie.

Joshua Bamford grew up in Perth, with his biologist parents and a variety of native fauna. He completed a B.Mus.(Hons), B.Sc. combined degree at UWA in 2013, while working as a singer (WA Opera), circus skills instructor, and venue assistant (UWA School of Music). In his final year at UWA, Joshua won both the Lady Callaway Medal, and Cruickshank-Routley Award. He has since been studying in the Music, Mind and Technology Master’s Programme at the University of Jyväskylä, including an exchange semester and research internship at the Cognitive Biology department of the University of Vienna. Joshua edits the Australian Music & Psychology Society Newsletter and sits on the council for the International Conference of Students of Systematic Musicology. Having received a D.Phil. offer from the University of Oxford, he is now raising funds for the next stage of his research. If he had spare time, he would be out swing dancing.
Friday 12
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Free Lunchtime Concert : The Winthrop Singers Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday in our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the finest musical talent locally, nationally and within the School.

Now in their 10th year, the Winthrop Singers, under the direction of Dr. Nicholas Bannan perform in this free Lunchtime Concert.

Entry is free, no bookings required.

13:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar Series, Seminar 1 2017 : Peace Building and Literature in Indo-Pakistan Relations More Information
The heritage of the novel as ‘the dominant form of narrative literature in the West’ was instrumental in the seminal work entitled ‘The Nature of Narrative’ by Robert Scholes and Robert Kellogg published in 1966. Their exploration of the meaning, character, plot and the point of view in narrative marked the start of narratology as a field of study. Since then this field has expanded to include studies, among others, in feminism, religion, art, political science and public policy. The approaches to narrative as an ideological tool and rhetoric that initially existed as independent strands have come to benefit from the diversity of views on the purposes served by narratives. This has occurred as global and local have also increasingly become intertwined with ideas moving across the globe with ease and contributing to multiple narratives that serve both literary and political purposes. Literary narratives have emerged both as the site for contested ideas as well as locale for peacebuilding. This paper explores the peacebuilding potential of literature with reference to the assumed conflict in the Indo-Pakistan conflict since 1947. It is premised on a notion of agency that is not necessarily intentional: writers do not always write to inculcate an agentic capacity among their audience. The process of writing could simply reflect their views on the directions they wish their world to take. But the impact extends beyond the intentionality of the authors and could result in shifting views among at least some of the audience. This view underpins the study of selected writers in India and Pakistan. The case study of Indian and Pakistani writers draws upon books, poems and columns written about the need for peace between the two countries since their independence in 1947. The paper argues that while intentionality of peacebuilding may not be directly claimed, these writers have contributed to a narrative that plays a role in transcending the boundaries of assumed differences and conflicts.

14:30 - EVENT - ANTHROPOLOGY / SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR SERIES, SEMESTER 1, 2017 : Relational losses in South African migrant families: Can communication technologies help fill the void? More Information
Emigration from one’s country of birth is an inherently life-changing event which requires uprooting from all that is familiar. It is a complex and far-reaching phenomenon affecting all members of a specific social network – both those who leave and those who stay behind. The bulk of migration research has focused on the experiences of the migrant person and/or family; whilst, by comparison, little attention has been given to the experiences of those left behind. A transnational perspective on migrant families – which acknowledges the systemic and interconnected nature of family life in a global world – allows us to give equal recognition to the experiences of those who leave their country of origin and, importantly, those who stay behind. South Africa offers a unique context within which to examine these migratory phenomena. Historically, it is a country characterized by various migratory practices – both internal and external. Moreover, it has witnessed considerable emigration, most often in response to specific political events both during the Apartheid years and since the inception of democracy in 1994. In this paper I will briefly discuss the historical context of South African emigration before focusing on some of the findings which have emerged from two qualitative research projects examining various psychological aspects of South African emigrant families. The focus of the discussion will be primarily on the experiences of those left behind, especially the elderly. My findings suggest that this group experiences significant relational losses as a result of the disruption in their social networks following the departure of their loved ones. Finally, I will look at how the most recent communication technologies can play an important role in maintaining transnational relationships, but also highlight the challenges that people may experience in maintaining a sense of intimacy and connection through these means.

15:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Square Kilometre Array and How it Will Work : Public Talk with Kevin Vincen Website | More Information
Kevin Vinsen is helping solve the extraordinary computational challenges facing the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). A Senior Research Fellow with the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), Vincen is a computational astronomy polymath - expert in numerous coding languages, artificial intelligence, genetic algorithms, high performance computing, data intensive astronomy, data mining, business analysis, games development, and command and control systems.

The data requirements for the SKA are astronomical, quite literally. When complete, the amount of data flowing from the SKA’s 10s of thousands of antennae will be measured in exabytes per day. Just one exabyte contains as much information as 2,000,000 Bluray Disks, a stack of 12km high each day.

Vincen enjoys talking about his passion for big science projects and speaks often at schools, community groups and for industry audiences. When he’s not dealing with super computers Kevin works on on a citizen science project called the PS1 Optical Galaxy Survey (POGS), a part of the SkyNet initiative. Using the collective processing power of home computers POGS is helping astronomers and astrophysicists to calculate the spectral energy distributions from optical infra-red and ultraviolet images to produce the first public catalog of its kind. This will require 10’s of millions of CPU hours to calculate and 100’s of TBytes of storage.

Vincen considers himself one of the luckiest astronomy geeks on the planet. He is paid to do what he loves - astronomy and computing with some of the biggest baddest computers on the planet. No wonder he is always smiling.

17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Fridays@5 : New Studies for Piano: Nicholas Bannan Website | More Information
Now in its third season, Fridays@Five is the ideal way to kick-start your weekend! Each session offers a unique musical experience to delight all music lovers, from young artist led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind the scenes workshops to lectures and masterclasses. Join us each week for a delightful musical surprise!

This week, Dr Nicolas Bannan introduces New Studies for Piano.

The twelve studies that will be introduced at this session were originally piano improvisation that were employed in the classroom to encourage discrimination between the different musical intervals within the octave. Their presentation at this session by Graeme Gilling, Gaby Gunders and Adam Pinto will be prefaced by an illustration of their pedagogical potential both as material to aid discrimination in listening, and as technical studies for the young pianist.

Entry is free, no bookings required.

19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Voice! Salon Series : Frauenliebe und -leben Website | More Information
In a collaboration of performance and research, Head of Vocal Studies Andrew Foote leads staff and students, in presenting a series of intimate and cozy salon style performances to delight every concertgoer.

In a collaboration between Music and German Studies, UWA students and their mentors will explore Schumann’s Romantic song cycle.

Tickets Standard $20 Concession $18 Friends of UWA School of Music $15 trybooking.com/OWZH
Tuesday 16
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Bite-Sized Austen: New interpretations in doctoral research Website | More Information
Parody and Prejudice: Jane Austen's 'Northanger Abbey' and the Literary Gothic Tradition by Colin Yeo, Doctoral student, English and Cultural Studies, The University of Western Australia.

The late eighteenth century saw a proliferation of popular women writers of Gothic fiction. In the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, it is worthwhile meditating on 'Northanger Abbey', a parody of Gothic fiction that is arguably one of Austen's 'lesser known' works. Austen's contribution to the Gothic as a textual mode that is self-aware cannot be understated.

This presentation aims to reflect on Austen's parody of established tropes and conventions of the Gothic. It also aims to situate 'Northanger Abbey' within its historical context as an important part of the Female Gothic tradition that emerged in the late eighteenth century.

The Tale of the Two Janes by Dr Peta Beasley, English and Cultural Studies, The University of Western Australia.

Born less than six months apart, both christened Jane, both from the same class, pseudo-gentry, both share a deep friendship and intimacy with their sister, both remain unmarried, both are in Bath at the same time and both novelists. However, to one, Jane Austen, literary history has been kind, the other, Jane Porter, unfortunately now virtually unknown. Ironic, given Jane Porter knew great success during her lifetime, dubbed by twentieth-century critic Robert Tate Irvine, as “the Margaret Mitchell of 1803,” while Jane Austen knew only slow-growing success during her lifetime. Although Porter, and her sister Anna Maria, admired Austen’s work enormously, it is unclear if Austen had reciprocal admiration for Porter’s work. But, there are two interesting intersections, both Porter and Austen had a professional scepticism (jealousy?) for the work of Sir Walter Scott, and both met, and were invited by the Royal Librarian, James Stanier Clark, to dedicate one of their novels to His Highness, the Prince of Wales. This presentation will tell the tale of the how the two Janes responded to the request.

18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - 'Bite-Sized Austen: New interpretations in doctoral research' : A UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies/Institute of Advanced Studies Public Lecture Website | More Information
This event consists of two lectures:

1) Parody and Prejudice: Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey and the Literary Gothic Tradition

A public lecture by Colin Yeo, Doctoral student, English and Cultural Studies, The University of Western Australia.

"Novels are so full of nonsense and stuff..." - Mr Thorpe, Northanger Abbey.

"Here they are, in my pocketbook. Castle of Wolfenbach, Clermont, Mysterious Warnings, Necromancer of the Black Forest, Midnight Bell, Orphan of the Rhine, and Horrid Mysteries. Those will last us some time." - Catherine, Northanger Abbey

A tone of self-awareness is a core aspect of the literary Gothic tradition. Writing within the paradigms of the eighteenth century Enlightenment's values of reason and rationality, writers of Gothic fiction ran the risk of alienating their audiences if their creations were too extravagant. At the same time, Gothic novels proved to be popular with the reading public. The late eighteenth century saw a proliferation of popular women writers of Gothic fiction. In the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, it is worthwhile meditating on Northanger Abbey, a parody of Gothic fiction that is arguably one of Austen's 'lesser known' works. Austen's contribution to the Gothic as a textual mode that is self-aware cannot be understated. Northanger Abbey was one of the first of Austen's novels to be composed and was only published after her death. The novel satirises the Gothic, featuring a protagonist who is a fan of Gothic novels and imagines that she is a heroine in a Gothic novel. This presentation aims to reflect on Austen's parody of established tropes and conventions of the Gothic. It also aims to situate Northanger Abbey within its historical context as an important part of the Female Gothic tradition that emerged in the late eighteenth century. As evidenced by the 2007 filmic adaptation of the text, interest in Austen has been a constant aspect of contemporary popular culture, an important point to note as we move into the 200th anniversary of her death.

Colin Yeo is a PhD candidate from English and Cultural Studies. Like Catherine Morland, he maintains a fervent interest in the literature of terror and horror, so much so that he decided to write his PhD thesis on the subject. His research interests are early modern literature, Gothic novels and contemporary horror film.

2) The Tale of the Two Janes

A public lecture by Dr Peta Beasley, English and Cultural Studies, The University of Western Australia.

Born less than six months apart, both christened Jane, both from the same class, pseudo-gentry, both share a deep friendship and intimacy with their sister, both remain unmarried, both are in Bath at the same time and both novelists. However, to one, Jane Austen, literary history has been kind, the other, Jane Porter, unfortunately now virtually unknown. Ironic, given Jane Porter knew great success during her lifetime, dubbed by twentieth-century critic Robert Tate Irvine, as “the Margaret Mitchell of 1803,” while Jane Austen knew only slow-growing success during her lifetime. Although Porter, and her sister Anna Maria, admired Austen’s work enormously, it is unclear if Austen had reciprocal admiration for Porter’s work. But, there are two interesting intersections, both Porter and Austen had a professional scepticism (jealousy?) for the work of Sir Walter Scott, and both met, and were invited by the Royal Librarian, James Stanier Clark, to dedicate one of their novels to His Highness, the Prince of Wales. This presentation will tell the tale of the how the two Janes responded to the request.

Peta Beasley’s PhD explored the issues of nationalism and heroism in the novels of Jane Porter (1776-1850). Peta’s publications include, a chapter titled “Transporting Genres” in Victorian Traffic, published by Cambridge Scholars in 2008, and a paper in Victorian Network (2009), entitled “Georgiana Molloy, Jane Porter and the Significance of Exploration Narratives for New Beginnings in a Strange Land”. She also co-authored a paper with Professor Andrew Lynch on Sir Thomas Malory, published in The Encyclopedia of British Medieval Literature in 2014 by Wiley-Blackwell, and contributed an article review for Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature journal in 2015. Peta is a sessional teacher at The University of Western Australia and Edith Cowan University.

About this Series - New Perspectives on Jane Austen: On the two-hundredth anniversary of her death, this UWA Institute of Advanced Studies - Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Lecture Series presents new perspectives on the life and work of Jane Austen. Drawing upon the latest literary and historical research, UWA researchers tackle key themes in Austen's work and the wider social and cultural contexts in which she created her now world-famous novels.

This is a free event, but RSVPs are required.
Wednesday 17
17:30 - MEMORIAL LECTURE - 2017 Isabelle Lake Memorial Lecture More Information
The annual Isabelle Lake Memorial lecture is an initiative of the Equal Opportunity Commission of Western Australia in partnership with the University of Western Australia. Isabelle was a young trans rights activist and former UWA student and transitioned shortly before she sadly passed away from leukaemia aged 21 in 2012.

Each year we honour her work, achievements and commitment to equality and inclusion through the Isabelle Lake Memorial lecture – further information is attached.

This is a free public event.

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