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Today's date is Thursday, September 21, 2017
Events for the public
 April 2017
Sunday 23
10:00 - EVENT - UWA School of Music Presents - WA Day of Percussion Website | More Information
Featuring performances and open workshops by local specialists and international guest artists in drumset, orchestral percussion, solo percussion, marimba technique, conga skills, percussion and electronics, and more.

Suitable for percussionists and percussion lovers of all ages and skill levels.

Tickets: Presale $25 Door $30 try booking.com/OPGC
Wednesday 26
19:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Voice! Salon Series : A Gilbert & Sullivan Celebration Website | More Information
Our Salon Series returns in 2017 as Head of Vocal Studies Andrew Foote leads talented young vocal students in a series of 3 intimate, salon style vocal concerts.

A Gilbert & Sullivan Celebration

“England, at the dawn of the Victorian age. Hansom cabs … mutton-chop whiskers … solid mahogany furniture. An era of solidity and respectability – even in the theatre!”

So begins the UWA Voice Students’ scripted concert of eight of the thirteen Gilbert and Sullivan operas. Andrew Foote leads a cast of more than 20 students in a delightful assortment of solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, sextets and massed singing from Patience, HMS Pinafore, Princess Ida, Pirates of Penzance, Ruddigore, Yeoman of the Guard and The Mikado. If you love your Gilbert and Sullivan – or even if you’re a sceptic – come and see why this repertoire is experiencing a revival. Groan at the jokes, toe-tap through the night, and go home humming the tunes with a smile of your face

Tickets: Standard $20 Concessions $18 Friends of Music $15 try booking.com/OWZF
Thursday 27
16:00 - FREE LECTURE - CMSS Seminar Series: The Forgotten Periphery: Creating the Iraqi Public Sphere Website | More Information
Abstract

Too many observers of present-day Iraq have accepted the argument that the nation-state was created, and remained the monopoly of certain groups. Because narratives of the past, particularly Arabic-language memoirs, have never been taken into account in the manufacture of this rigid (and unsophisticated) argument, the dynamics of diverse groups outside of the government and their influence on regime politics is frequently ignored. And yet, despite the purported Sunni and Arab-centric biases of Hashemite Iraq and the later republican regime of Abdul-Karim Qasim, the voices of the so-called periphery were quite influential in the making of the Iraqi nation. Activist leaders did emerge from regions tenuously linked to the formative nation. Moreover, some of them were co-opted into government, thereby giving the lie to the alleged inflexibility of the politics of the period. This lecture will be based primarily on recently-published Arabic-language memoirs of ex-politicians, poets and journalists who lived in the Hashemite and early Republican eras and who left important records challenging stereotypical, exaggerated and unidimensional explanations of nation-formation in Iraq (1941-63).

About the speaker:

Hala Fattah received her PhD from UCLA in the history of the Modern Middle East in 1986. She has authored two books: ‘The Politics of Regional Trade in Iraq, Arabia and the Gulf, 1700-1900’, (SUNY Press, 1997); and ‘A Brief History of Iraq’, (Facts on File, 2008) and various articles on late Ottoman and independent Iraq. She taught the history of modern Middle East, Iraq and the Gulf at Georgetown University, and then worked as a researcher in Jordan at Prince Hassan ibn Talal’s office and the Royal Institute of Inter-Faith Studies. In 2004, she became the resident representative for The American Academic Research Institute on Iraq (TAARII), an organisation devoted to academic exchange. In 2006, she joined the Scholar Rescue Fund, a programme focused on the placement of endangered Iraqi scholars in neighbouring Arab and non-Arab countries. From 2013 to 2015, she was Assistant Professor in the Humanities Department at Qatar University, where she taught the history of the Indian Ocean. Hala Fattah is now an independent scholar and a consultant in Amman, Jordan.

Dr Fattah is visiting the Centre for Muslim States and Societies, The University of Western Australia, as part of the Australian National University's Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies' 'CAAR International Speakers Program'. This program is supported by the Commonwealth through the Council for Australian-Arab Relations (CAAR), which is part of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

18:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Winthrop Singers : ANZAC Commemoration Website | More Information
The Winthrop Singers present Philip Gearing's Pro Patria Mori featuring Head of Keyboard Studies Graeme Gilling.

Entry is free, no bookings required.
Friday 28
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Free Lunchtime Concert : UWA Voice Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday in our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the finest musical talent locally, nationally and within the School.

This weeks concert will feature talented students from the UWA Voice program accompanied by pianist Caroline Badnall.

17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Fridays@5 : The Schoenberg Project Website | More Information
Now in its third season, Fridays@Five is the ideal way to kick-start your weekend! Each session offers a unique musical experience to delight all music lovers, from young artist led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind the scenes workshops to lectures and masterclasses. Join us each week for a delightful musical surprise!

Sechs kleine Klavierstücke, Op. 19 (or Six Little Piano Pieces) is a set of pieces for solo piano written by the Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg. In the exciting collaboration between UWA Piano and the UWA New Music Ensemble, composer James Ledger will work with UWA Composition students as they rearrange these works for small ensemble. Presented alongside the original piano works and these new arrangement will be composer Brett Dean's arrangements (scored for a 12 piece ensemble) which were completed when he was a student!

Entry is free, no bookings required.

18:00 - EXHIBITION OPENING - Opening Night: HERE&NOW17: New Photography + Kevin Ballantine: Photographs 1986 - 2001 Website | More Information
Join us for the opening of two new photography exhibitions. HERE&NOW17: New Photography curated by Chelsea Hopper features newly commissioned work from WA-based artists Jacqueline Ball, Scott Burton, Lucy Griggs, Georgia Kaw, Dan McCabe and Lydia Trethewey.

Kevin Ballantine: Photographs 1986 - 2001 curated by Sally Quin is a 15-year survey of Ballantine’s practice, capturing the urban landscapes of Perth and Fremantle.

To be opened by Max Pam, Honorary Lecturer, School of Arts and Humanities, Edith Cowan University.

 May 2017
Monday 01
17:00 - FREE LECTURE - CMSS Public Lecture: Sharia in Islam - What it is, and what it is not Website | More Information
CMSS Public Lecture:

Shari'a in Islam: what it is, and what it is not.

Date: Monday, 1 May 2017 Time: 5pm to 6.30pm Venue: Austin Lecture Hall, 159, Arts Building, UWA. Entry: Free RSVP: via Eventbrite or email to cmss-ss@uwa.edu.au

In this lecture Dr Khalid Zaheer will focus on common misconceptions about Shari'a and explain what Shari'a is and is not, with concrete historical and contemporary examples.

Dr Khalid Zaheer is a student of the prominent Islamic scholar Javed Ahmad Ghamidi of Pakistan. Zaheer's doctorate from University of Wales (1994) was a critique of Islamic banking. He taught Islamic studies and Islamic ethics in business in Lahore University of Management Sciences from 1996 to 2006. He was the Dead of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences in the University of Central Punjab from 2009 to 2012. He is currently a Fellow of Al-Mawrid, an institute for Islamic education and research in Pakistan.
Tuesday 02
8:00 - CONFERENCE - Science on The Swan 2017: One Health : Science on the Swan, WA’s annual premier health and medical research conference Website | More Information
One Health seeks root cause understanding and effective solutions to emergent infectious and acquired diseases through, fundamental stem cell and regenerative medical science, public health and environmental remedies, working synergistically to advance the health of all species and the varied places in which they live. The conference and associated workshops provide an opportunity to interact with global research leaders in this important 21st century field. The program includes internationally recognised speakers and many of Australia’s top One Health researchers working in partnership with industry to deliver effective health outcomes for our planet. Please go to http://scienceontheswan.com.au/ for registration. Early Bird expires 24th April 2017

8:00 - CONFERENCE - Science on The Swan 2017: One Health : Science on the Swan, WA's annual premier health and medical research conference Website | More Information
One Health seeks root cause understanding and effective solutions to emergent infectious and acquired diseases through, fundamental stem cell and regenerative medical science, public health and environmental remedies, working synergistically to advance the health of all species and the varied places in which they live. The conference and associated workshops provide an opportunity to interact with global research leaders in this important 21st century field. The program includes internationally recognised speakers and many of Australia’s top One Health researchers working in partnership with industry to deliver effective health outcomes for our planet. Please go to http://scienceontheswan.com.au/ for registration.
Thursday 04
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series 2017 : From Barges to Gentlemen's Yachts: The archaeology of the Port of Perth 1830-1900 More Information
In 2011 Dr Gaye Nayton gave a public talk at the “More than grass – Exploring the Esplanade” conference, organised by the History Council of Western Australia. Dr Nayton’s talk was entitled “Foreshore treasure: The potential archaeology of the buried Port of Perth” where she stated that while the “Parks themselves have their own archaeology associated with leisure activities since they were created … in the case of the foreshore parks there is a whole different landscape buried deep underneath them”. Two recent consultancy excavation and monitoring programmes at the Supreme Court Garden and Elizabeth Quay have proved Dr Nayton correct. The seminar will discuss recent archaeological evidence from the construction of the first jetty in 1830 through to the eventual burying of both the Reveley and Barrack St Jetties under landfill by 1900. The changing Port of Perth landscape and its resultant impact on the archaeology will also be discussed.
Friday 05
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Free Lunchtime Concert : UWA Winds Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday in our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the finest musical talent locally, nationally and within the School.

Entry is free, no bookings required.

17:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Fridays@5 : Student Takeover: Dekleva, Tchaikovsky & Thalberg Website | More Information
Now in its third season, Fridays@Five is the ideal way to kick-start your weekend! Each session offers a unique musical experience to delight all music lovers, from young artist led concerts to informal musical drinks on the famous grassy knoll, behind the scenes workshops to lectures and masterclasses. Join us each week for a delightful musical surprise!

Sigismond Thalberg – Grand Caprice sur des motifs de 'La Sonnambula', op.46 (solo piano) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Selections from the Nutcracker Suite (two pianos) James Dekleva – 'Winter and Spring' (mezzo-soprano and piano) James Dekleva – Piano Trio no.1 in D major (piano trio)
Sunday 07
14:30 - CONCERT - Sea Symphony : University of Western Australia Choral Society Website | More Information
Sea Symphony, composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams and inspired by Walt Whitman’s magnificent poetry, depicts the majesty and mystery of the sea. Composed between 1903 and 1909, it was the composer’s first and longest choral work. Sea Symphony superbly evokes the power of the sea and celebrates the brave explorers who navigate its waters, whilst also using the sea as a metaphor for a voyage into eternity. Hear this ambitious and bold masterpiece brought to life by a choir of over 100 singers, including two outstanding Australian soloists, Katja Webb and Andrew Foote, with a full orchestra conducted by Christopher van Tuinen.

Tickets can be purchased online via http://ticketswa.com/event/sea-symphony or at the door. Prices: $45 and $40 (concession)

16:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Keyed Up! : Next Generation - Shuan Hern Lee Website | More Information
International award winner Shuan Hern Lee is a remarkable young pianist, with skill and musicianship beyond his years. In 2017 Shuan begins his undergraduate studies at UWA at the age of just 14. We welcome him to UWA with a very special concert where he will perform works by Chopin, Prokofiev and Vine.

PROGRAM Shuan Hern Lee - Mobile Thematic Madness Bach - Chromatic Fantasie and Fugue in D minor BWV 903 Chopin - Sonata no. 2 Op. 35 Prokofiev - Toccata Op. 11 Chopin - Ballad no. 2 Op. 38 Schumann - Sonata Op. 22 Balakirev - Islamey Vine - Toccassimo

Tickets Standard $20 Concessions $18 Friends of Music $15 trybooking.com/OWRJ
Tuesday 09
13:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Talking Allowed: Seeing Allowed? : Professor Jane Lydon (Wesfarmers Chair of Australian History) will speak to a number of issues that surround images of suffering. While it would seem that in 2017 photographs and images are becoming central to socio-political and ideological tensions, Professor Lydon will explore whether or not real change can be wrought by harrowing images of suffering. Website | More Information
Over the last two years and with the rise of the citizen photographer, there have been radical changes in how we respond to photographs and images, particularly those that reveal unimaginable suffering. Whether it is a photograph of the lifeless body of Aylan Kurdi washed ashore near the Turkish resort of Bodrum, the images of Dylan Voller spit-hooded and shackled to a restraint chair, or the photograph of the Muslim woman amidst the carnage on Westminster Bridge, images appear to have acquired a new status in their capacity to prompt indignation and action. Which images can we say have changed the course of history? And what makes an image powerful at a particular moment? In her talk ‘Seeing Allowed?’, Professor Jane Lydon (Wesfarmers Chair of Australian History) will speak to a number of issues that surround images of suffering. While it would seem that in 2017 photographs and images are becoming central to socio-political and ideological tensions, Professor Lydon will explore whether or not real change can be wrought by harrowing images of suffering.

17:00 - LECTURE - Countering Violent Extremism in Africa More Information
Centre for Muslim States and Societies and UWA Africa Research Cluster invite you to a public lecture on

"Countering Violent Extremism in Africa"

by His Excellency Ambassador Prof. Julius Kibet Bitok, PhD, Kenya High Commissioner to Pakistan

In this lecture, Professor Bitok will discuss and assess the experiences and policies for countering violent extremism in Africa, through perspectives from both his own academic and institutional backgrounds.

About the speaker

Amb. Prof. Julius Kibet Bitok has had a distinguished career in Public Service sparing over 15 years covering a broad spectum of assignments. He combines in-depth expertise and experience drawn from a cross-section of engagements in public service, diplomatic service, research and academia in Kenya and abroad. He rose through the ranks in Moi University from tutorial fellow to the highest level of Associate proffessor of Finance. He later served as the Dean of faculty of Commerce in the Cooperative University of Kenya. He also served as a technical advisor on finance matters to the presidency in Kenya.
Wednesday 10
17:00 - FREE LECTURE - Dance Dance Evolution: How humans found their groove Website | More Information
Humans are really good at moving in time. Our knack for rhythmic synchronisation sets us apart from much of the animal world, aside from a few notable exceptions (parrots, sea lions, dolphins and possibly some other primates). Evolution is a tough business, and specialised cognitive abilities tend not to survive for long without a purpose. So, why can we dance? The answer may be in how we socialise.

Through this talk, I will explore contemporary theories which aim to explain the evolution of music and dance in terms of the social needs of our species. Coordinated, synchronised activity makes us like each other more, and may serve to bind groups together. Studies by myself and others are now trying to identify the neural-cognitive mechanisms involved in this synchrony-bonding effect, using a variety of methods: from motion capture to hormonal measurements.

In a world that is increasingly divided, understanding ways in which humans have traditionally bound groups together has never been more important. If we developed a capacity for rhythmic synchronisation as a mechanism for building positive feelings of affiliation between individuals in large social groups, then we would do well to learn from our ancestors and remember how to boogie.

Joshua Bamford grew up in Perth, with his biologist parents and a variety of native fauna. He completed a B.Mus.(Hons), B.Sc. combined degree at UWA in 2013, while working as a singer (WA Opera), circus skills instructor, and venue assistant (UWA School of Music). In his final year at UWA, Joshua won both the Lady Callaway Medal, and Cruickshank-Routley Award. He has since been studying in the Music, Mind and Technology Master’s Programme at the University of Jyväskylä, including an exchange semester and research internship at the Cognitive Biology department of the University of Vienna. Joshua edits the Australian Music & Psychology Society Newsletter and sits on the council for the International Conference of Students of Systematic Musicology. Having received a D.Phil. offer from the University of Oxford, he is now raising funds for the next stage of his research. If he had spare time, he would be out swing dancing.
Friday 12
13:00 - SEMINAR - Asian Studies Seminar Series, Seminar 1 2017 : Peace Building and Literature in Indo-Pakistan Relations More Information
The heritage of the novel as ‘the dominant form of narrative literature in the West’ was instrumental in the seminal work entitled ‘The Nature of Narrative’ by Robert Scholes and Robert Kellogg published in 1966. Their exploration of the meaning, character, plot and the point of view in narrative marked the start of narratology as a field of study. Since then this field has expanded to include studies, among others, in feminism, religion, art, political science and public policy. The approaches to narrative as an ideological tool and rhetoric that initially existed as independent strands have come to benefit from the diversity of views on the purposes served by narratives. This has occurred as global and local have also increasingly become intertwined with ideas moving across the globe with ease and contributing to multiple narratives that serve both literary and political purposes. Literary narratives have emerged both as the site for contested ideas as well as locale for peacebuilding. This paper explores the peacebuilding potential of literature with reference to the assumed conflict in the Indo-Pakistan conflict since 1947. It is premised on a notion of agency that is not necessarily intentional: writers do not always write to inculcate an agentic capacity among their audience. The process of writing could simply reflect their views on the directions they wish their world to take. But the impact extends beyond the intentionality of the authors and could result in shifting views among at least some of the audience. This view underpins the study of selected writers in India and Pakistan. The case study of Indian and Pakistani writers draws upon books, poems and columns written about the need for peace between the two countries since their independence in 1947. The paper argues that while intentionality of peacebuilding may not be directly claimed, these writers have contributed to a narrative that plays a role in transcending the boundaries of assumed differences and conflicts.

13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA School of Music Presents - Free Lunchtime Concert : The Winthrop Singers Website | More Information
Be transported from the everyday in our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the finest musical talent locally, nationally and within the School.

Now in their 10th year, the Winthrop Singers, under the direction of Dr. Nicholas Bannan perform in this free Lunchtime Concert.

Entry is free, no bookings required.

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