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Today's date is Saturday, September 23, 2017
Events for the public
 February 2017
Thursday 09
17:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Setting the rhythm for cell division in plants : Public Lecture by Prof Christine Foyer, Leeds University, UK Website | More Information
All are welcome to this public lecture, "Setting the rhythm for cell division in plants" by internationally renowned researcher Professor Christine Foyer.

Register online at www.ioa.uwa.edu.au/events/register
Friday 10
18:00 - EVENT - Exhibition Opening: Helen Britton, Works from Warburton, The Likeness Website | More Information
UWA Chief Cultural Officer Professor Ted Snell is pleased to invite you to the opening of three new exhibitions:

Helen Britton: Interstices + Works of Art from Warbuton + The Likeness Helen Britton: Interstices is a 25-year survey of the work of renowned jeweller Helen Britton, including new works that draw inspiration from Western Australia’s coastline. Works of Art from Warbuton, from the Berndt Museum Collection gives you an opportunity to experience work by Aboriginal artists from the remote desert community of Warburton. The Likeness is an exhibition of portraits and self-portraits from the Cruthers Collection of Women's Art, the nation’s only public collection of art by Australian women.

More information coming soon.
Saturday 11
10:00 - OPEN DAY - Lions Eye Institute Open Day : LEI's New $5M hi-tech clinic - The gift of sight More Information
Have a chat with LEI's Managing Director Professor David Mackey. Meet the staff and clinicians at the new $5M Hi-tech clinic. Take a tour of our state-of-the-art Outback Vision Van. Try the simulator glasses that mimic eye diseases. Everyone welcome to learn about the special gift of sight.
Wednesday 15
12:00 - VISITING SPEAKER - Raine Visiting Professor Lecture Series : Prof Brayne presents "Research fit for an Ageing, Challenged and Challenging, Global Society: a Public Health Perspective" More Information
Professor Carol Brayne is an internationally recognised leader in academic public health at University of Cambridge, UK. Professor Brayne has pioneered the study of dementia in the general population, launching two major longitudinal studies of the health and cognitive functioning of 30,000 older people. The results underpin our understanding of dementia and the ageing brain. Her studies have provided the basis for planning long term care needs in the United Kingdom and have recently shown that the prevalence of dementia at specific ages is declining.
Wednesday 22
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - One Hundred Prisoners and a Lightbulb Website | More Information
A public lecture by Hans van Ditmarsch, Senior Researcher, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France.

Consider this riddle: "A group of 100 prisoners, all together in the prison dining area, are told that they will be all put in isolation cells and then will be interrogated one by one in a room containing a light with an on/off switch. The prisoners may communicate with one another by toggling the light-switch (and that is the only way in which they can communicate). The light is initially switched off. There is no fixed order of interrogation, or interval between interrogations, and the same prisoner will be interrogated again at any stage. When interrogated, a prisoner can either do nothing, or toggle the light-switch, or announce that all prisoners have been interrogated. If that announcement is true, the prisoners will (all) be set free, but if it is false, they will all be executed. While still in the dining room, and before the prisoners go to their isolation cells (forever), can the prisoners agree on a protocol that will set them free?"

Dr van Ditmarsch's talk will present a solution, however his talk will mainly address such puzzles of knowledge in general. There are many others, such as the ‘Muddy Children Puzzle’ (also known as the ‘Wisemen Puzzle’), ‘Surprise Examination’, ‘Monty Hall’, etc. They often involve a (seemingly) paradoxical aspect making agents knowledgeable by announcements of their ignorance. There is a relation with the area in logic known as ‘dynamic epistemic logic’.

Hans van Ditmarsch is a senior researcher at CNRS (the French National Research Organization), and based at LORIA in Nancy, where he is heading the research team CELLO (Computational Epistemic Logic in Lorraine). He is currently an Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow at The University of Western Australia, working with Dr Tim French, Senior Lecturer in Computer Science and Software Engineering.
Thursday 23
17:00 - FREE LECTURE - Trump Shock and the Indo-Pacific : Implications for our region Website | More Information
You're invited to a high-calibre public panel discussion on the impact of President Trump's Administration on the Indo-Pacific region. Panellists will discuss: What will U.S. leadership in the Indo-Pacific look like under the Trump Administration? How will the Indo-Pacific region's economic and security architecture adjust, particularly after U.S. withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership? How will Chinese and other policymakers likely respond to the Trump agenda on trade, alliances and regional diplomacy? This event is a collaboration between the Asia Research Centre at Murdoch University, the Perth USAsia Centre and the Confucius Institute at The University of Western Australia.

 March 2017
Wednesday 01
18:00 - TALK - An Evening of Death Website | More Information
Death and grieving are essential aspects of human experience and imagining. And yet, discussion of both remains heavily circumscribed.

In this public forum we will lift the veil and peer into the unknown with special guests Dr Brooke Davis, Dr Fiona Jenkins and Dr Jennifer Rodger. We will consider the nature of death and grief from three critical perspectives: literature, philosophy and neuroscience. We will consider the manner in which stories may be used to translate grief, the nature of death itself, the ways in which death shapes the lives of the living, and the impact grief has on our brains. Our goal is to spark a conversation about mortality and our relationship to it, one that we hope will encourage greater critical reflection on cultural taboos that constrain the lived experience of loss.

Speakers:

Dr Brooke Davis - Brooke Davis holds an honours degree from the University of Canberra and a PhD from Curtin University, both in creative writing. 'Lost and Found', her first novel, received the Western Australian Premier's Book Award for Emerging Writers in 2016.

Dr Fiona Jenkins - Fiona Jenkins is Associate Professor in the School of Philosophy, RSSS, Australian National University. She is the author of five books, including 'Love, Death and Freedom', a treatise on French existential philosophy.

Dr Jennifer Rodger - Jennifer Rodger is an Associate Professor and NHMRC Senior Research Fellow at Experimental and Regenerative Neurosciences within the School of Animal Biology, at The University of Western Australia. She currently leads a research team investigating issues of brain plasticity relevant to brain disorders.
Thursday 02
18:00 - FREE LECTURE - 50 years of the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination More Information
Adopted by the UN General Assembly on 21 December 1965, the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD) was the first of the United Nations human rights treaties to be adopted. Applying in a different context over 50 years later and in a rapidly changing international environment, what does the future hold for ICERD? Ms Crickley will reflect on this and respond to questions on international and domestic issues such as Indigenous rights. University Club UWA Crawley Campus RSVP: By 23rd February 2017 to: events-law@uwa.edu.au.

Please let us know if you have any access requirements: +61 8 6488 4282
Friday 03
13:00 - PERFORMANCE - UWA Music presents Free Lunchtime Concert : Reedefined Clarinet Quartet More Information
Be transported from the everyday in our free lunchtime concert series, featuring the finest musical talent locally, nationally and within the School.

This week, in our first Lunchtime Concert of 2017, student-led ensemble Reedefined Clarinet Quartet and special guests Voix Quintet will present a program of works for wind trios, quartets and quintets.

Free entry - all welcome!
Monday 06
9:00 - GUIDED TOUR - UWA Campus Tour : Start your pursuit with a UWA campus tour Website | More Information
Our stunning campus offers a vibrant and dynamic learning environment with its mix of heritage buildings, contemporary architecture and beautiful gardens. Current UWA students will take you on a tour of our campus giving you an insight into what it’s like to be a student at UWA.

Join us for informal morning tea after the tour. Our Future Students team will also be available to answer questions on courses, entry requirements and the UWA student experience.

All future students and their families are welcome.

Bookings are essential so please head to the webpage provided to register.

12:00 - STAFF EVENT - Futures Observatory Tour, hosted by Ruby the NAO Robot Website | More Information
6, 7, 8 & 9 March 2017; 12:00pm - 12:30pm; Limit of 10 people per session

As part of our mission to engage all communities around the University, provide opportunities for learning and discovery and advance the capability of our NAO robot we engaged our own UWA Computer Science School to work with Ruby over the summer period.

Our four computer science students have worked hard to enable some of Ruby’s more advanced functionality, culminating these individual tasks the students were challenged to write and conduct a program for Ruby to host a Futures Observatory tour, engage with the audience (by answering questions) and narrate the tour between different exhibits within the Futures Observatory.

In 30 minutes hear about how different technologies are being used for teaching and learning, how the Centre for Education Futures is supporting innovative projects and engage with our exhibits during the tour itself.

Register for the tour via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Tuesday 07
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Fifty Years of Writing Australian History from the Periphery : The Inaugural Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture Website | More Information
By Professor Henry Reynolds, University of Tasmania.

Henry Reynolds is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Humanities at the University of Tasmania. He grew up and was educated in Hobart and after a few years in Europe he took up a lectureship in history at the Townsville University College, now James Cook University, in 1967 remaining there until 1999. During that time he developed a strong interest in the history of settler/indigenous relations resulting in the publication of a series of books. Among his best-known titles are 'The Other Side of the Frontier', 'This Whispering in our Hearts', 'The Law of the Land', and 'Why Weren’t We Told'. His books have won many national prizes. His most recent work has been about the history of war and his two most recent books are 'Forgotten War', and 'Unnecessary Wars'.

I began teaching and researching Australian history fifty years ago this year. This lecture will reflect on my years as an historian. Living and working in north Queensland my interest turned to the history of race relations. At the forefront of my work was the situation of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders both in the past and the present. But north Australia also had in the nineteenth century a large Asian diaspora. Pursuing this distinctive local history forced me to question many aspects of traditional Australian historical writing. In doing so my career trajectory ran parallel with that of my near contemporary, colleague and friend Tom Stannage.

The Inaugural Tom Stannage Memorial Lecture

This memorial lecture commemorates the exceptional contribution made by Professor Tom Stannage (1944-2012) to the Western Australian community. Professor Stannage was a prominent Australian historian who worked hard to foster a wider understanding of Western Australian history and heritage. He is remembered as an inspiring teacher and a passionate advocate for the study of history.
Thursday 09
16:00 - SEMINAR - Archaeology Seminar Series 2017 : The ‘Works of the Old Men’ in (Saudi) Arabia More Information
For over a century aerial archaeology has been in the vanguard of archaeological discovery and recording. Thanks to a unique twenty year programme of aerial reconnaissance in Jordan combined with the growing availability of high-resolution satellite imagery we can now thickly ‘populate’ with often novel archaeological sites one of the most inhospitable landscapes in the world – ‘Arabia’. Bio: David Kennedy has taught at UWA since 1990 after 12 years at the University of Sheffield. His principal research interests are the Roman Near East and Aerial Archaeology. He has been engaged in a programme of Aerial Archaeology in Jordan since 1997, the only such programme outside Europe. He is currently working on a book, ‘East of Jordan’ in the Nineteenth Century: Travel and Travellers in North-Western Jordan.

17:30 - BOOK LAUNCH - Book Launch: Like Nothing on this Earth by Tony Hughes-d'Aeth : Celebrate the release of this significant literary history of the Wheatbelt Website | More Information
UWA Publishing warmly invites you to the launch of Like Nothing on this Earth: A Literary History of the Wheatbelt by Tony Hughes-d'Aeth.

Like Nothing on this Earth will be launched by Prof. Matthew Tonts, Pro Vice Chancellor and Executive Dean.

Please RSVP by Monday 6 March for catering purposes.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Price We Pay for Straight Line Thinking and the Battle for Beeliar Website | More Information
A public lecture by Carmen Lawrence, Director of the Centre for the Study of Social Change, School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia.

Too often planning decisions are made without reference to their human impact, except in the narrowest sense of projected economic outcomes. Straight line thinkers overlook the deep connections between people and place and are particularly blind to the effects on people and their communities of destroying natural environments, native animals and plants. The decision by the current state government to proceed with the long abandoned extension of Roe Highway and in the process to destroy the Beeliar wetlands, raze the Coolbellup bushlands and dissect communities into polluted enclaves, illustrates just how destructive such decisions can be.

In this lecture, Professor Lawrence will explore research which demonstrates the powerful effects of place and the natural environment on human well-being and conversely what happens when such environments are destroyed. Using illustrations from the campaign to halt the construction of Roe 8, she will also explore the genesis of a powerful community of interest and the many ways people have found to give expressions to their desire to protect people and place.
Tuesday 14
12:30 - STAFF EVENT - Explore the possibilities with HP Sprout (demonstration) Website | More Information
Tuesday 14 March 2017; 12:30pm – 1:00pm

Thursday 16 March 2017; 1:00pm – 1:30pm

Friday 17 March 2017; 10:00am – 10:30am

Limit of 2 people per session

Futures Observatory partner Hewlett-Packard (HP), have loaned a Sprout Pro to the Futures Observatory. This is HP’s latest in immersive computing. With fast 3D and 2D scanning, touch mat, and high quality video recording the Sprout is a collaborative tool that can be used for rapid prototyping and 3D modelling.

Attendance at this event will explore the functionality of the Sprout and conjure ideas for the use of the Sprout in Teaching and Learning. The Centre for Education Futures is eager to help support ideas and support staff through this process for implementation in class or a pilot.

Register via the Eventbrite link listed below.

16:30 - FREE LECTURE - Public Lecture by Mr Richard Heydarian : The Philippines in 2017: President Duterte, the South China Sea and ASEAN Website | More Information
You are invited to join us for a public lecture on the escalating South China Sea dispute and how the assertive policies of Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte are shaping this dispute and wider East Asian geopolitics. In 2017, the Philippines are chairing the ASEAN bloc in its 50th year. As the institution reflects on its achievements over the last five decades, focus must not be taken away from the urgent and future challenges that face this organisation.

18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - ‘Hardly any women at all’? Literary landscapes at the time of Jane Austen : A Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies/Institute of Advanced Studies Public Lecture Website | More Information
In a famous scene in Northanger Abbey, Catherine Morland confesses to Henry Tilney that she rarely reads history, finding it ‘tiresome’. ‘I read it a little as a duty’, she admits, ‘but it tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me. The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars or pestilences, in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all’.

Catherine’s frustration evokes a literary-historical landscape from which women are missing, and this ‘absent woman’ of course becomes the centre of the comic gothic plot of the novel. But while Catherine laments this absence, her conversation with Eleanor and Henry shows us something rather different. Catherine seems part of a lively culture of literary conversation in the last decades of the eighteenth century: she discusses her reading preferences; debates the value and gendered readership of novels (mentioning the very popular novelist Ann Radcliffe by name); and is even able to tantalize the more sophisticated Tilneys with a piece of literary gossip out of London.

This talk explores literary landscapes for women in Britain in the late eighteenth century. Were they absent or present? How did they participate? Were they predominantly readers (like Catherine) and rarely writers (like Radcliffe or Austen herself), or more closely involved? And how might this milieu have influenced Austen’s own trajectory as a writer in provincial England?

19:00 - TALK - Friends of the UWA Library Speaker : Preserving Aboriginal Culture through Language More Information
About the talk

In this paper Julian discusses the positive impact reclaiming language has for first people. He cites the growing understanding that Indigenous language is inseparable from culture - that language is integral in affirming and maintaining wellbeing, self-esteem and identity. The National Trust of Western Australia is contributing to the reclamation of Aboriginal languages in the Goldfields region through the establishment of the Goldfields Aboriginal Languages Centre in Kalgoorlie.

About the Speaker

Julian Donaldson – Chief Executive Officer National Trust of Western Australia

Julian joined the Trust in January 2016. He was previously CEO of the Perth International Arts Festival. His interest is in inspiring community support for heritage which he believes contributes much to a sense of community well-being.

Members : Free Guests : $5.00
Wednesday 15
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Families Still Seeking Asylum: Political Impacts and Community Responses in Australia : The 2017 Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture Website | More Information
By Dr Caroline Fleay, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Human Rights Education, Curtin University.

The responses of most political leaders to people seeking asylum lie in contrast to growing numbers of others in Australia who are disturbed by the impacts of policies on asylum seekers and their families. Over the past 25 years the responses of Australia’s major political party leaders have generally hardened when increasing numbers of people seeking asylum arrive in small boats. This is despite the fact that relatively few people have ever sought asylum in Australia compared with many other countries. The impact on asylum seekers of the harsh policies implemented by political leaders particularly over the last five years continues to be profound and lasting.

This includes the devastating consequences of policies that effectively prevent the reunion of refugees who came to Australia by boat, with their families. The majority of people who arrive by boat are men, reflecting the dangers of the long journey and their hope that they may at least get their immediate families to join them safely once they arrive. Instead, many women and children are now forced to remain in precarious and often dangerous and violent situations in their own or neighbouring countries. Australian policies prevent the safe passage of families to be re-united, forcing families to be rendered apart indefinitely.

This presentation will outline the adverse impact that Australian political leaders and their policies have on people seeking asylum and their families. It will also explore a range of community responses that challenge these policies, highlighting acts of solidarity, activism and community building that defy and challenge political attempts to dehumanise, punish and divide.

Dr Caroline Fleay is Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Human Rights Education, Curtin University, where she teaches human rights and conducts research into the experiences of people seeking asylum in Australia. She has been a regular visitor to some of WA’s sites of immigration detention and written extensively about the impacts on people seeking asylum of indefinite detention and being released into the community with minimal supports.

The Grace Vaughan Memorial Lecture

This annual lecture commemorates the life and achievements of Grace Vaughan, a social worker, social activist and parliamentarian, who was dedicated to the improvement of life at all levels and had a deep commitment to Australia’s participation in the Asian region and to ensuring women’s full participation in society. The lecture is presented by the Australian Association of Social Workers, the Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia and Department of Local Government and Communities Western Australia.

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