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Today's date is Wednesday, November 22, 2017
School of Computer Science and Software Engineering
 September 2017
Wednesday 06
13:00 - STAFF EVENT - DEMONSTRATION: Unleashed VR: Soft Skills Training in Virtual Reality : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Virtual Reality (VR) offers all of the benefits of e-learning, including scalability, 24/7 scheduling flexibility and being highly affordable in comparison to paying for the time of live trainers. A unique advantage of VR training is its ability to replicate real-life scenarios in numerous interactive ways. Students build knowledge and confidence in safe and judgment-free environments and apply their knowledge in challenging simulations that are otherwise difficult to re-create.

Perspective-shifting training also gives students an understanding of other's points of view, leading to higher levels of empathy and a better understanding of expected behaviours in the workforce.

VR simulations also capture data that can be analysed to provide personalised feedback to students. This leads to a greater understanding of individual strengths and weaknesses.

Finally, VR is enjoyable and an effective way to engage students to develop their workplace skills in a highly flexible and scalable training environment.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Friday 08
11:00 - EVENT - SHOWCASE: Ruby the Robot : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Ruby is a NAO robot, NAO is the world’s leading and most widely used humanoid robot for education, healthcare, and research. NAO is 58cm tall, autonomous, and fully programmable robot that can walk, talk and listen. Meet Ruby, see what she can do and explore the problem solving required when coding and opportunities to use Robots in learning and teaching.

Many have seen her guiding and touring through the Futures Observatory and now after more work from our Computer Science students we have enabled more of her functionality and designed new code for her better interact with humans. Some of her new abilities include:

THE RED BALL: Explore with Ruby the problem solving required to manoeuvre obstacles using her feet sensors and cameras located on her body. Then work with her to interact and play with a red ball aiming to shoot a goal, and hearing her interactivity as she recognises either a hit or miss.

WHO AM I: Have a conversation with Ruby as she learns to recognise your face and has a personalised conversation with you. Demonstrating her facial recognition technology and ability to transform a conversation with her artificial intelligence you can engage with the future of soft skills that all artificial intelligent robots will possess.

SIMON SAYS: Watch Ruby follow instructions you give her as she replicates the movements spoken. By interacting in this way, you can see her 25 degrees of freedom and dexterity from her fingers, showing humanoid movements a robot can perform that you have never seen before!

We will have some of our students present during these events to talk about the challenges and successes they had in the project and their foray into a career in coding and robotics.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Monday 11
14:00 - STAFF EVENT - WORKSHOP: Design Augmented Reality Experiences Using Aurasma : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Aurasma is an augmented reality platform which could potentially change the way you interact with the real world. Recent UWA TechNode surveys at UWA indicate that most students have a mobile device. Given this, Aurasma opens up opportunities in an instructional and educational manner, as the need for more detailed information exists in a physical space or document where a mobile device with wifi is available. For example, once pointed at printed documents, static physical places, or objects with augmented markers, mobile devices can discover information such as videos, animations, weblinks or 3D objects that are woven into the fabric of the real world by using Aurasma.

This hands-on workshop will take 45 minutes. You will get the opportunity to experience augmented reality examples as a learner using the Aurasma App and also create a basic AR experience using the Aurasma App. We will also demonstrate the Basic Free Aurasma Studio platform that enables you to create more complex auras with more functionality.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Wednesday 13
10:00 - EVENT - SHOWCASE: Ruby the Robot : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Ruby is a NAO robot, NAO is the world’s leading and most widely used humanoid robot for education, healthcare, and research. NAO is 58cm tall, autonomous, and fully programmable robot that can walk, talk and listen. Meet Ruby, see what she can do and explore the problem solving required when coding and opportunities to use Robots in learning and teaching.

Many have seen her guiding and touring through the Futures Observatory and now after more work from our Computer Science students we have enabled more of her functionality and designed new code for her better interact with humans. Some of her new abilities include:

THE RED BALL: Explore with Ruby the problem solving required to manoeuvre obstacles using her feet sensors and cameras located on her body. Then work with her to interact and play with a red ball aiming to shoot a goal, and hearing her interactivity as she recognises either a hit or miss.

WHO AM I: Have a conversation with Ruby as she learns to recognise your face and has a personalised conversation with you. Demonstrating her facial recognition technology and ability to transform a conversation with her artificial intelligence you can engage with the future of soft skills that all artificial intelligent robots will possess.

SIMON SAYS: Watch Ruby follow instructions you give her as she replicates the movements spoken. By interacting in this way, you can see her 25 degrees of freedom and dexterity from her fingers, showing humanoid movements a robot can perform that you have never seen before!

We will have some of our students present during these events to talk about the challenges and successes they had in the project and their foray into a career in coding and robotics.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.
Monday 18
11:00 - EVENT - SHOWCASE: Ruby the Robot : Event for mLearning Month - September 2017 Website | More Information
Ruby is a NAO robot, NAO is the world’s leading and most widely used humanoid robot for education, healthcare, and research. NAO is 58cm tall, autonomous, and fully programmable robot that can walk, talk and listen. Meet Ruby, see what she can do and explore the problem solving required when coding and opportunities to use Robots in learning and teaching.

Many have seen her guiding and touring through the Futures Observatory and now after more work from our Computer Science students we have enabled more of her functionality and designed new code for her better interact with humans. Some of her new abilities include:

THE RED BALL: Explore with Ruby the problem solving required to manoeuvre obstacles using her feet sensors and cameras located on her body. Then work with her to interact and play with a red ball aiming to shoot a goal, and hearing her interactivity as she recognises either a hit or miss.

WHO AM I: Have a conversation with Ruby as she learns to recognise your face and has a personalised conversation with you. Demonstrating her facial recognition technology and ability to transform a conversation with her artificial intelligence you can engage with the future of soft skills that all artificial intelligent robots will possess.

SIMON SAYS: Watch Ruby follow instructions you give her as she replicates the movements spoken. By interacting in this way, you can see her 25 degrees of freedom and dexterity from her fingers, showing humanoid movements a robot can perform that you have never seen before!

We will have some of our students present during these events to talk about the challenges and successes they had in the project and their foray into a career in coding and robotics.

Register for this event via the Eventbrite link listed below.

 October 2017
Thursday 12
15:00 - SEMINAR - “Multiscale model reduction for flows in heterogeneous porous media” More Information
Abstract We combine discrete empirical interpolation techniques, global mode decomposition methods, and local multiscale methods, to reduce the computational complexity associated with nonlinear flows in highly heterogeneous porous media. The resulting reduced-order approach enables a significant reduction in the flow problem size while accurately capturing the behaviour of fully-resolved solutions. Below we use of random boundary conditions in constructing snapshot vectors to build local basis functions. We show that by using only a few of these randomly generated snapshots, we can adequately approximate dominant modes of the solution space. Collaborators: Y. Efendiev, J.C. Galvis, M. Ghommem, E. Guildin, G. Li
Monday 16
14:00 - SYMPOSIUM - The Clever Country: The importance of investing in regional and remote students Website | More Information
This symposium brings together a panel of experts from across Australia to discuss ways to support regional and remote students to succeed in higher education. The purpose is to explore the value of investing in higher education from the perspective of the individual, community and the university sector and to question what we need to do to become a truly ‘clever country'.

The symposium will feature the following panel of experts:

Professor Grady Venville Chair (Dean of Coursework Studies, The University of Western Australia)

Tim Shanahan (Chair, WA Regional Development Trust)

Professor Sally Kift PFHEA (President, Australian Learning and Teaching Fellows, Former DVC – Academic, James Cook University)

Professor Steven Larkin (Pro Vice-Chancellor, Indigenous Education and Research, University of Newcastle)

Vicki Ratliff (Director, Equity Policy and Programmes, Australian Government Department of Education and Training)

Professor Sue Trinidad (Director, National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education)

The symposium will be held in The University Club of Western Australia Auditorium, and refreshments will be provided. Attendance is free, but tickets are limited so RSVP is essential. Reserve your ticket here: http://bit.ly/2xunNxe
Thursday 19
13:00 - FREE LECTURE - Discussions on New Discoveries in Gravitational Wave Search : This lecture will discuss the progress of gravitational wave discoveries. More Information
The first detection of gravitational waves from binary black holes was made in September 2015. This not only confirmed Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity, but also marked the beginning of a new era of gravitational wave astronomy. In recognition of the promising revolutionary effect of this discovery in astrophysics, in October 3, 2017, the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to the three pioneers in the field, Rainer Weiss (MIT), Kip Thorne and Barry Barish (Caltech). Since the first discovery, three more confirmed detections of gravitational waves from binary black holes have been announced. In September 2017, for the first time, the Virgo detector in Italy and the two LIGO observatories in US made a joint three-detector detection. On October 16th, a new breakthrough is to be announcement that is considered by many as revolutionary as the first detection.

The three groups in the UWA node of Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) contributed to these discoveries ranging from instrumentation, signal processing, theory, to electromagnetic follow up observations. This lecture will discuss the progress of gravitational wave discoveries with focus on the new event as well as the UWA contributions.

The speakers will be joined by Dr. Clancy James, Prof. David Coward and Prof. Chris Power, for a panel discussion.
Friday 20
13:00 - TALK - Mathematics Meets Art: Early Renaissance Art and the Need for Perspective Website | More Information
Not only did the early Renaissance painters seek to improve their methods of spatial illusionism, they believed that sophisticated knowledge of geometry was integral. Leon Battista Alberti (1435) believed the first requirement of a painter was to know geometry, whereas Piero Della Francesca went to great lengths to reduce painting to principles of perspective and solid geometry.

Join Dr John Bamberg of the UWA School of Mathematics and Statistics to see how perspective art leads to interesting mathematics. We will see that there is more than meets the eye when we explore the geometric properties of perspective.

John Bamberg grew up north of Melbourne, and completed a BSc (Hons) in pure mathematics at La Trobe University in 1999. He came to UWA in 2000 to study for a PhD under the supervision of Prof Cheryl Praeger and Prof Tim Penttila, in the subject of finite group theory (the mathematics of symmetry). His first postdoc began in 2004 (an ARC Postdoctoral Discovery grant) with Tim Penttila, which lead him into another branch of mathematics; finite geometry. In 2006, John was awarded a Marie Curie fellowship at Ghent University (Belgium), where he lived for nearly three years, before returning to Perth to begin another postdoc in collaboration with Gordon Royle and Michael Giudici. In 2012, he was granted an ARC Future Fellowship (at UWA), and as of the beginning of 2017, he has evolved into a regular teaching and research member of the university.

Campus Partner: School of Mathematics and Statistics
Wednesday 25
11:00 - WORKSHOP - NHMRC Project Grant Workshop More Information
This workshop will help those new to applying for Project Grants to plan their application. We'll also cover how applications are assessed, with input from a recent Grant Review Panel member. RSVP: Via Eventbrite

Monday 30
11:00 - WORKSHOP - NHMRC New Grant Program: Workshop & Further Information More Information
Presentation and question/answer session with DVCR Prof Robyn Owens, and Faculty of Health & Medical Sciences Associate Dean-Research, Prof Hugh Barrett

 November 2017
Friday 03
16:00 - EVENT - Groups and Combinatorics Seminar 16:00 Fri 03/11/2017 Weatherburn LT: Yian Xu More Information
Speaker: Yian Xu (University of Western Australia) Title: Constructing a 2-arc-transitive cover for a certain hypercube Time and place: 16:00 Friday 03/11/2017 in Weatherburn LT

Abstract: The canonical basis, which is a particular type of basis of a vector space will be introduced in this talk, and a sufficient and necessary condition is given to determine the existence of such a basis for a vector space. The structures of canonical bases are then used to study Cayley graphs of extraspecial $2$-groups of order $2^{2r+1}$ ($r eq 1$), which are further shown to be normal Cayley graphs and $2$-arc-transitive covers of $2r$-dimensional hypercubes. ​
Tuesday 14
8:30 - WORKSHOP - Cancer Council WA - Consumer and Community Involvement in Research Workshop Website | More Information
With grant writing season almost upon us, this workshop can help researchers learn how to implement involvement activities into their grant applications. With research funders increasingly requiring consumer and community involvement to be included in grant applications this workshop is a must. This is the last training workshop for 2017!

This workshop will help researchers: · Increase awareness of the value of involvement · Develop understanding and skills on the ‘how and why’ of implementing involvement · Identify and address the barriers to consumer and community involvement

14:00 - WORKSHOP - Research Impact Workshop: Creating Opportunities for Impact Website | More Information
The Office of Research Enterprise has engaged Dr Tamika Heiden, Principal of Knowledge Translation Australia to present a series of research impact sessions at UWA. This workshop is aimed at UWA researchers looking to gain a clear understanding of impact and engagement and the mechanisms they can implement now in order to meet future requirements of the Engagement and Impact Assessment (EIA) submission. For researchers at UWA, this workshop will be valuable in helping you build your capacity and knowledge in impact and engagement. It will include a practical component to enhance the relatability of the workshop to your own research projects.
Thursday 16
8:45 - CONFERENCE - 2017 Australian Institute of Physics WA Postgraduate Conference Website | More Information
This year's Australian Institute of Physics WA postgraduate student conference will be held at the University of Western Australia on Thursday November 16. Morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea will be provided. For detailed information, go to bit.ly/2xtfA0G. Register at bit.ly/2ytIPQk.

- All PhD, Masters and Honours students at WA institutions are invited to present their research on the day by giving a 10-12 minute talk. We are currently receiving abstracts, which can be sent to Philipp at p.schoenhoefer@murdoch.edu.au until the 31st of October. See more information about abstracts below. Register through the 2017 Conference eventbrite page.

- 3rd year physics students conducting research are invited to present their work via poster presentation. The specifics will depend on the number of abstract submissions. Third years need only register their interest by emailing p.schoenhoefer@murdoch.edu.au before the 31st of October.

In the event of a large number of abstracts being submitted, some talks may be assigned to a session of 3-minute-thesis style presentations. In this way, we hope to be able to give the majority of students the opportunity to present.

This year the 2017 WA Postgraduate Conference will be held on the same day as the AIP AGM and annual dinner at the University Club of UWA. All conference participants and guests are welcome to register for both the AGM and dinner as well (register at bit.ly/2gmDgMU).
Tuesday 21
12:30 - SYMPOSIUM - Computational Modelling in Health & Disease Symposium Website | More Information
On November 21st, Dr Barry Doyle is holding a Computational Modelling in Health and Disease Symposium to showcase some of the exciting ways computers and computational models are being used for medical research, with applications ranging from haemodynamics to artificial intelligence. This event brings together researchers from UWA, Murdoch University, and Curtin University, as well as guests from the Murdoch Children's Research Institute in Melbourne and Griffith University in Queensland. For those working in this area, this should be a great opportunity to meet with existing colleagues as well as make new connections. For others, come learn about the amazing ways that computers and computational methods can help better understand physiology and help improve the way we treat patients. The venue for the symposium is the G24 Seminar Room at the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research. Please remember to RSVP, via the link below. The event will begin at 12.30pm after the NHMRC info session that is on in the McCusker Auditorium.
Thursday 30
17:00 - SEMINAR - Cancer Council WA - THE FUTURE OF CANCER RESEARCH EVENT Website | More Information
The purpose of the event is to update Western Australian researchers on cancer research funding opportunities in light of changes to the funding landscape both locally and nationally.

The event is to be attended by the Honourable Roger Cook, Deputy Premier; Minister for Health; Mental Health with presentations from guest speakers from the following organisations: Future Health Research and Innovation Fund Cancer Research Trust Medical Research Future Fund National Minderoo Eliminate Cancer Initiative Health and Medical Research Council Cancer Australia Cancer Council WA Cancer Council Australia

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