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Today's date is Friday, July 28, 2017
School of Computer Science and Software Engineering
 April 2017
Monday 10
14:00 - STAFF EVENT - A Longitudinal, Competency-Based Clinical Assessment System : Presentation by a Futures Observatory Scholarship Holder Website | More Information
Come along to a presentation about how the School of Dentistry at UWA has developed and implemented a longitudinal, competency-based clinical assessment system. Its development was supported by a Futures Observatory Scholarship and is a joint effort between the School of Dentistry and the School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering at UWA. This system is now utilised school-wide at the School of Dentistry.

Its development was driven by the need to have a modern and robust competency-based assessment system that improves student learning, assists teaching and provides predictive data for future clinical performance of the student. This is particularly important in dentistry as dental students can practice dentistry as independent practitioners immediately after graduation.

The system is in fact an on on-line database structured around “core” and “silo” competencies as they translate to clinical dental practice. Students’ performance in attaining these competencies is tracked throughout the duration of the course and therefore one can monitor the progress, level of performance and its repeatability as well as the spectrum of competencies covered.

Other existing clinical assessment systems use a static, number-based approach. These are based on the inherent assumption that is a task is performed a number of times then at the end of this repetitive process then the associated competencies would have been attained. It is obvious therefore that with such systems the focus is on quantity rather than quality, is time-bounded and does not give enough information to easily identify the areas needing improvement.

The system which has been developed allows for the performance to be monitored longitudinally with a bias for quality rather than quantity using specific clinical dental criterion-referenced assessment rubrics.

The collected data is available in real-time individually to the students and to the staff using a simple web browser. The student has the benefit of receiving objective feed-back that tracks their own progress and identifies precisely the core competencies that need improvement. The staff and the school can monitor more efficiently the clinical performance of the students, either on individual or as a group

Although the application has been developed for dental teaching the platform can be translated to any other course that is competency-based and uses CRA to assess the student performance. It can customised to specific needs, deployed in a variety of environments and to use it one would need just internet access and a web browser.
Thursday 13
9:00 - EVENT - Pawsey Clinic at The University of Western Australia : Pawsey Clinics are events organised for researchers who need to use Pawsey services. Website | More Information
The Pawsey Supercomputing Centre would like to invite you to the Pawsey Clinic at The University of Western Australia. This is one of a series of clinics. The clinic will commence with a 30 minute presentation about the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre at 9.00am, followed by consultations through the morning.

WHAT IS A PAWSEY CLINIC?

Pawsey Clinics are events organised for researchers who need to use Pawsey services. They can find out how to gain access to supercomputing, data or visualisation systems and how they can benefit from the expertise of Pawsey staff in transitioning their research. This is also an opportunity for current users who need one-on-one advice from one of Pawsey’s experts to take their research to the next level or get help with code issues.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

Researchers who do not know how supercomputing, data and visualisation services can improve their projects.

Pawsey users that need a one-on-one session with a Pawsey expert to get answers about issues including queue scripts, source code compilation and debugging, profiling, data and workflow needs, and any other matters they may have.

TIME AND VENUE:

The University of Western Australia, Conference Room in the Pawsey at UWA offices located on the ground floor of the Physics building. 9.00 am to 12.00 pm, Thursday 13 April 2017. The is a free event. Please RSVP before Friday 7 April Please feel free to share this information with your colleagues if you think it might be of interest. The information has been uploaded into our calendar of events: https://www.pawsey.org.au/events/?date=Apr%202017 and also into the Pawsey Clinics page: https://www.pawsey.org.au/pawseyclinics/

 May 2017
Monday 01
18:00 - COURSE - R Basics Evening Course : This practical course introduces you to R More Information
R is a free and extremely powerful language and software environment for statistical computing, data analysis, and graphics. This course is designed for those who have little to no experience with R, but have a basic understanding of statistics. Those without this knowledge are encouraged to attend the Introductory Statistics course first. More details at http://www.cas.maths.uwa.edu.au/courses/r-basics-evening-course
Tuesday 09
9:00 - EVENT - Statistics Short Course: Spatial Point Patterns : Analysis of spatial data using R and spatstat Website | More Information
Spatial point pattern datasets are becoming common across many fields of research. However, statistical methodology for analysing these data has not been easily accessible. This course is a practical introduction to the analysis of spatial point patterns with a strong focus on hands-on exercises throughout the course.

The course gives an in-depth introduction to spatstat, an R package for analysing spatial point patterns. The package supports a complete statistical analysis of spatial point pattern data: data input and inspection, calculations, plotting, exploratory data analysis, hypothesis tests, model-fitting, simulation, Monte Carlo methods and model diagnostics.

 June 2017
Tuesday 27
9:00 - EVENT - Introductory Statistics Website | More Information
The aim of this course is to introduce you to basic statistics. It will cover descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations); data exploration; basic categorical data analysis; simple linear regression and basic analysis of variance (ANOVA). The statistical package SPSS will be used to illustrate the ideas demonstrated. The course will be held in a computer laboratory allowing participants to immediately apply the material covered through a series of practical examples.

 July 2017
Tuesday 04
9:00 - EVENT - R Basics Website | More Information
R is a free and extremely powerful language and software environment for statistical computing, data analysis, and graphics. The course is designed for those who have no experience with R, but have a basic understanding of statistics. Those without this experience are encouraged to attend the Introductory Statistics course first.
Wednesday 05
9:00 - Masterclass - Numerical methods for forward and inverse problems in geophysics : A masterclass with Dr. Roland Martin, senior research scientist at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse 3, France. Website | More Information
In the last twenty years, many improvements have been made in earth imaging at different scales using different technologies such as active/passive seismics, electromagnetism, potentials (gravity, magnetism, electric potentials),….

The wide variety of data to be inverted to retrieve the earth's properties needs to develop or use different data inversion methods at different scales in time and space. Those methods can be also combined to take advantage of their respective potentialities.

The inversion methods can be based on local/global optimisation approaches (generally gradient like approaches) or stochastic approaches (simulated annealing, genetic algorithms, neighbourhood methods). The advantages and disadvantages will be discussed and some simple/theoretical or realistic examples in electrical capacitance tomography or seismics will be shown.

It is also extremely important to have a good forward problem solver able to approximate the data as accurately as possible. Those techniques can be based on finite differences on different grids at different orders in space (staggered, compact, collocated), finite volumes or finite elements. Some stability and dispersion criteria will be also provided.

Dr Martin will first show, in the case of the wave propagation equation, the different schemes that are commonly used, their advantages and drawbacks.

The boundary conditions used in the direct problem are also important and will be treated such as the paraxial conditions and the perfectly matched layers approaches. This is crucial for many applications in seismic imaging, for instance, where solutions should not introduce spurious modes from the outer boundaries into the computational domain that could deteriorate the solutions during the inverse problem.

Dr. Roland Martin senior research scientist at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse 3, France and has been working for many years in France where he obtained his PhD in Geophysics (1998). He has been a researcher in Mexico City (1999-2004) before integrating the French CNRS (equivalent to the Australian CSIRO) in 2005 at Pau University and GET laboratory in Toulouse. His main interests are the numerical modelling in geophysics at different scales using different numerical techniques for the forward and inverse problems. He is developing and applying those techniques to the modelling and imaging the Earth at different scales: from the near subsurface or laboratory scale to the Earth crust scale with some specific sites of study like the well monitored Pyrenees chain located between Spain and France. Seismic and gravity dense measurements are mainly used to obtain more information on both seismic wave velocities and densities in the Earth crust and to couple the structures to the surface using not only high resolution numerical tools but also more complex physics in solid-fluid mechanical systems. In 2017, Roland was awarded an Institute of Advanced Studies Robert and Maude Gledden Visiting Senior Fellowship.
Tuesday 11
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Numerical Modelling and Imaging in Geophysics at Different Scales: applications to the pyrenees chain and the subsurface/laboratory scale : A public lecture by Dr. Roland Martin, senior research scientist at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse 3, France. Website | More Information
In this lecture Dr Martin will present different high order numerical tools using finite-difference or finite element approaches to propagate seismic waves in a wide variety of Earth structures at different scales in order, in the near future, to couple them through different physics related to different frequency content of the sources involved. He will discuss two applications that could be linked in the future: the Pyrenees chain imaging at moderate source frequencies and wet/dry (non-)linear viscoelastic wave modelling in wet/dry/non-consolidated granular materials in the near surface. Dr Martin will present a hybrid inversion method that allows us to image density distributions at the regional scale using both seismic and gravity data. One main goal is to obtain densities and seismic wave velocities (P and S) in the lithosphere with a fine resolution to get important constraints on the mineralogic composition and thermal state of the lithosphere. In the context of the Pyrenees (located between Spain and France), accurate Vp and Vs seismic velocity models are computed first on a 3D spectral element grid at the scale of the Pyrenees by inverting teleseismic full waveforms. In a second step, Vp velocities are mapped to densities using empirical relations to build an a priori density model. BGI and BRGM Bouguer gravity anomaly data sets are then inverted on the same 3D spectral element grid as the Vp model at a resolution of 1-2 km by using high-order numerical integration formulae. This procedure opens the possibility to invert both teleseismic and gravity data on the same finite-element grid. It can handle topography of the free surface in the same spectral-element distorted mesh that is used to solve the wave equation, without performing extra interpolations between different grids and models. WGS84 elliptical Earth curvature, SRTM or ETOPO1 topographies are used. Dr Martin will reproduce numerically the response of seismic waves in granular/porous media at the laboratory scale (01.-10kHZ sources) and this will enable us to better understand the signals recorded close to the surface when high frequency content will be used to better image the near surface, in particular by taking into account seasonal water content variations and complex rheologies and steep seismic velocity gradients present in the first hundred meters depths. Dr. Roland Martin is a senior research scientist at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse 3, France and has been working for many years in France where he obtained his PhD in Geophysics (1998). He has been a researcher in Mexico City (1999-2004) before integrating the French CNRS (equivalent to the Australian CSIRO) in 2005 at Pau University and GET laboratory in Toulouse. His main interests are the numerical modelling in geophysics at different scales using different numerical techniques for the forward and inverse problems. He is developing and applying those techniques to the modelling and imaging the Earth at different scales: from the near subsurface or laboratory scale to the Earth crust scale with some specific sites of study like the well monitored Pyrenees chain located between Spain and France. Seismic and gravity dense measurements are mainly used to obtain more information on both seismic wave velocities and densities in the Earth crust and to couple the structures to the surface using not only high resolution numerical tools but also more complex physics in solid-fluid mechanical systems. In 2017, Roland was awarded an Institute of Advanced Studies Robert and Maude Gledden Visiting Senior Fellowship.
Tuesday 18
9:00 - COURSE - Data Visualisation : Understanding how to display data Website | More Information
This course will cover topics such as:

-Presenting data for a single variable: Including an introduction to histograms, box plots, and bar graphs

-Visualisation of two or more variables: Including an introduction to scatterplots, pairs plots, parallel coordinate plot and variable-width stack bar charts

-Other plots and maps: Including a brief introduction to plots for time series, bubble plots and more

-Data Ink: Essential parts of a graphic, Tufte’s Data-Ink ratio and how to increase it

-Colour and perception: Colour palettes, preattentive features

-An introduction to ggplot2
Wednesday 19
10:00 - Masterclass - An Overview to Fuzzy-Model-Based Control : A masterclass with A masterclass with Professor Hak Keung Lam, Department of Informamtics, King’s College London. Website | More Information
This masterclass gives an overview of the fuzzy-modelbased control systems with emphasis on stability analysis, in particular for the issues of relaxation of stability analysis results. The development of FMB control from the concept of fuzzy logic first proposed in 1965 and early stage of fuzzymodel-free control ideas to the state-of-the-art FMB control system analysis will be presented as a start. It then walks through the beauty of fuzzy-model-free control to the advance of fuzzy-model-based control. Professor Lam will then present his notion on the partially/imperfectly premise matching and membership-function-dependent analysis, which bring the stability analysis of fuzzy-model-based control system to another level from the point of view on applicability, practicality, design issues and relaxation of stability analysis. In short, the design constraints and conservativeness of stability analysis are alleviated compared with the traditional approach. Various practical applications will be demonstrated in support of the claims.

Professor Hak Keung Lam received the B.Eng. (Hons.) and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, in 1995 and 2000, respectively. During the period of 2000 and 2005, he worked with the Department of Electronic and Information Engineering at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University as PostDoctoral Fellow and Research Fellow respectively. He joined as a Lecturer at King’s College London in 2005 and is currently a Reader. His current research interests include intelligent control and computational intelligence. He has served as a program committee member, international advisory board member, invited session chair and publication chair for various international conferences and a reviewer for various books, international journals and international conferences. He is an associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems, IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II: Express Briefs, IET Control Theory and Applications, International Journal of Fuzzy Systems and Neorocomputing; and guest editor for a number of international journals. He is a coeditor of two edited volumes: Control of Chaotic Nonlinear Circuits (World Scientific, 2009) and Computational Intelligence and Its Applications (World Scientific, 2012), and author/coauthor of three monographs: Stability Analysis of Fuzzy-Model-Based Control Systems (Springer, 2011), Polynomial Fuzzy Model Based Control Systems (Springer, 2016) and Analysis and Synthesis for Interval Type-2 Fuzzy-Model-Based Systems (Springer, 2016).

This masterclass is jointly organised by the UWA Institute of Advanced Studies and the Complex Data Modeling Engineering for Remote Operations (ERO) group, UWA Faculty of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences.

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