UWA Logo What's On at UWA
   UWA HomeProspective Students  | Current Students  | Staff  | Alumni  | Visitors  | About  |     Search UWA    for      
 

What's On at UWA

* Login to add events... *
Today's date is Thursday, November 23, 2017
School of Civil and Resource Engineering
 February 2017
Wednesday 22
11:00 - STUDENT EVENT - Typical First Week - Engineering, Computing and Mathematics Website | More Information
All new students are strongly encouraged to attend this session to get you started at UWA. The session provides you with key information and activities to get you connected to UWA online resources, study support and provides a taste of what to expect in your first week at UWA. The session will include information delivered by UniStart, StudySmarter and UWA Libraries.

12:00 - STUDENT EVENT - Engineering, Computing and Mathematics Orientation : Optional for Student Exchange and Study Abroad students Website | More Information
Your orientation program involves a series of fun and informative activities and events to help you settle into life at UWA and kick-start your student journey.

The activities have been developed for you by UWA Staff, so they have been carefully designed to get you ready for study and success at a tertiary level.

By the end of the 1-day orientation program, you will:

* Be formally welcomed to UWA * Know a group of students doing the same units as you * Be familiar with the campus * Be familiar with UWA online systems * Know what's expected of you at UWA * Meet your lecturers and other staff here to help you succeed * Discover opportunities available as a UWA student

What to bring:

* A mobile device if possible (i.e. tablet, Smartphone or Laptop) * Hat and water bottle * A willingness to learn and have fun!

All new students are expected to attend Orientation.

 March 2017
Monday 27
8:00 - WORKSHOP - Ensuring High Quality Seismic Data for the Mining Industry Workshop : Associated event - Deep Mining Conference in Perth Website | More Information
The workshop will provide a forum to discuss the different aspects that impact on data quality with the following aims: •To provide mine site rock engineers and seismologists with practical knowledge to ensure the highest quality data for the site •To identify problems impacting on the industry which need to be addressed with focussed R&D
Tuesday 28
8:00 - CONFERENCE - Eighth International Conference on Deep and High Stress Mining : ACG Conference in Perth Website | More Information
Underground mining continues to progress at deeper levels and industry is now extracting mineral reserves at depth that previously would have been considered unmineable. Deep mining is a very technical and challenging environment. A high level of understanding and technically sound approaches are essential to satisfactorily deal with the significant geotechnical (from squeezing ground to rockbursts) and logistical (transportation, ventilation) issues of deep and high stress mining, and best practice and innovation need to be implemented.

The Australian Centre for Geomechanics looks forward to hosting the Eighth International Conference on Deep and High Stress Mining in Perth in March 2017. This follows the previous conferences held in Sudbury, 2014; Perth, 2012; Santiago, 2010; Perth, 2007; Quebec City, 2006; Johannesburg, 2004; and Perth, 2002.
Friday 31
8:00 - SEMINAR - Developments in Rock Stress Measurements and Monitoring Seminar : Associated event - Deep Mining Conference in Perth Website | More Information
This seminar will address the latest technology, applications and ideas in rock stress measurements and monitoring, through case studies and discussions with those in the industry. The seminar aims to target those involved in stress fracturing and stress monitoring in all underground excavations.

 April 2017
Thursday 13
9:00 - EVENT - Pawsey Clinic at The University of Western Australia : Pawsey Clinics are events organised for researchers who need to use Pawsey services. Website | More Information
The Pawsey Supercomputing Centre would like to invite you to the Pawsey Clinic at The University of Western Australia. This is one of a series of clinics. The clinic will commence with a 30 minute presentation about the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre at 9.00am, followed by consultations through the morning.

WHAT IS A PAWSEY CLINIC?

Pawsey Clinics are events organised for researchers who need to use Pawsey services. They can find out how to gain access to supercomputing, data or visualisation systems and how they can benefit from the expertise of Pawsey staff in transitioning their research. This is also an opportunity for current users who need one-on-one advice from one of Pawsey’s experts to take their research to the next level or get help with code issues.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

Researchers who do not know how supercomputing, data and visualisation services can improve their projects.

Pawsey users that need a one-on-one session with a Pawsey expert to get answers about issues including queue scripts, source code compilation and debugging, profiling, data and workflow needs, and any other matters they may have.

TIME AND VENUE:

The University of Western Australia, Conference Room in the Pawsey at UWA offices located on the ground floor of the Physics building. 9.00 am to 12.00 pm, Thursday 13 April 2017. The is a free event. Please RSVP before Friday 7 April Please feel free to share this information with your colleagues if you think it might be of interest. The information has been uploaded into our calendar of events: https://www.pawsey.org.au/events/?date=Apr%202017 and also into the Pawsey Clinics page: https://www.pawsey.org.au/pawseyclinics/
Wednesday 26
8:00 - SEMINAR - Tailings Management: Practical Considerations : Workshops and Seminar on Tailings Management Website | More Information
This event will comprise a one-day hands-on cone penetration testing (CPT) and static liquefaction workshop and a two-day seminar on the management, operation and relinquishment of tailings storage facilities (TSF).

 May 2017
Tuesday 02
8:00 - SEMINAR - Instrumentation and Slope Monitoring Seminar : Two day seminar Website | More Information
The ACG is proud to host a two-day seminar that is targeted to supporting the continued development and application of advanced monitoring systems to all types of mine sites and their waste landforms.
Thursday 04
8:00 - WORKSHOP - Management of Moving and Unstable Slopes Workshop : One day workshop Website | More Information
This workshop provides a theoretical and practical framework for the understanding and management of moving and unstable slopes. The workshop deals with the actions and approaches appropriate for personnel and managers to resolve these adverse situations in a positive manner.
Tuesday 09
9:00 - EVENT - Statistics Short Course: Spatial Point Patterns : Analysis of spatial data using R and spatstat Website | More Information
Spatial point pattern datasets are becoming common across many fields of research. However, statistical methodology for analysing these data has not been easily accessible. This course is a practical introduction to the analysis of spatial point patterns with a strong focus on hands-on exercises throughout the course.

The course gives an in-depth introduction to spatstat, an R package for analysing spatial point patterns. The package supports a complete statistical analysis of spatial point pattern data: data input and inspection, calculations, plotting, exploratory data analysis, hypothesis tests, model-fitting, simulation, Monte Carlo methods and model diagnostics.

 June 2017
Tuesday 06
9:00 - COURSE - Blasting for Stable Slopes Short Course : Three day short course Website | More Information
This course will examine the mechanisms and possible extent of damage to the rock structure behind the face from blasting and the influence that has on the stability of pit walls. The course includes consideration of the mechanisms of rock breakage that operate within a blast and considers means of optimising wall damage adjacent to the blast. The influence of burden relief, geological structure and application of field controls to verify the use of design parameters will be stressed. Common techniques of wall control, including pre-splitting, will be detailed.
Wednesday 21
9:30 - Masterclass - Earthquakes - How predictable are they? : A masterclass with Margaret Boettcher, Associate Professor of Geophysics, University of New Hampshire. Website | More Information
While earthquake predictability is poorly understood, some faults have more regular seismicity than others. Earthquakes on oceanic transform faults exhibit many of the most systematic and predictable behaviors known in seismology and therefore provide a window into earthquake forecasting on potentially damaging faults. On short time scales (hours to days) earthquakes on these faults display extremely high levels of foreshock activity. On intermediate time scales (years) oceanic transform faults show the clearest evidence of quasi-periodic seismic cycle behavior in the instrumental record. And on long temporal and spatial scales (decades & 100s of km) the size and frequency distributions of oceanic transform fault earthquakes can be predicted from scaling relations dependent only on transform fault lengths and slip rates.

In 2008 the periodicity of oceanic transform fault earthquakes was put to the test when an array of ocean bottom seismometers were positioned on Gofar Transform Fault, located just south of the equator on the East Pacific Rise. The next expected earthquake on this fault occurred right on time and the seismometers recorded an incredible dataset including the magnitude 6.0 earthquake, thousands of foreshocks, and the aftershock sequence.

In this Masterclass participants will discuss maximum expected magnitudes, fault zone complexity, time-dependent earthquake forecasts, and examples of successful and unsuccessful recent earthquake forecasts and more. Join us to learn about some of Earth’s most predictable earthquakes- those on oceanic transform faults!

Margaret Boettcher is an Associate Professor of Geophysics at the University of New Hampshire. Her research aims to constrain the physical properties of fault zones using records of earthquake ground motion, laboratory friction experiments, and numerical models. She is particularly interested in contributing to the worldwide effort to address seismic hazard issues of societal importance. Her contributions have largely focused on understanding earthquakes in two very different, yet relatively simple, environments: mid-ocean ridge transform faults and deep gold mines.

Margaret Boettcher is a UWA Robert and Maude Gledden Senior Visiting Fellow.

 July 2017
Wednesday 05
9:00 - Masterclass - Numerical methods for forward and inverse problems in geophysics : A masterclass with Dr. Roland Martin, senior research scientist at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse 3, France. Website | More Information
In the last twenty years, many improvements have been made in earth imaging at different scales using different technologies such as active/passive seismics, electromagnetism, potentials (gravity, magnetism, electric potentials),….

The wide variety of data to be inverted to retrieve the earth's properties needs to develop or use different data inversion methods at different scales in time and space. Those methods can be also combined to take advantage of their respective potentialities.

The inversion methods can be based on local/global optimisation approaches (generally gradient like approaches) or stochastic approaches (simulated annealing, genetic algorithms, neighbourhood methods). The advantages and disadvantages will be discussed and some simple/theoretical or realistic examples in electrical capacitance tomography or seismics will be shown.

It is also extremely important to have a good forward problem solver able to approximate the data as accurately as possible. Those techniques can be based on finite differences on different grids at different orders in space (staggered, compact, collocated), finite volumes or finite elements. Some stability and dispersion criteria will be also provided.

Dr Martin will first show, in the case of the wave propagation equation, the different schemes that are commonly used, their advantages and drawbacks.

The boundary conditions used in the direct problem are also important and will be treated such as the paraxial conditions and the perfectly matched layers approaches. This is crucial for many applications in seismic imaging, for instance, where solutions should not introduce spurious modes from the outer boundaries into the computational domain that could deteriorate the solutions during the inverse problem.

Dr. Roland Martin senior research scientist at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse 3, France and has been working for many years in France where he obtained his PhD in Geophysics (1998). He has been a researcher in Mexico City (1999-2004) before integrating the French CNRS (equivalent to the Australian CSIRO) in 2005 at Pau University and GET laboratory in Toulouse. His main interests are the numerical modelling in geophysics at different scales using different numerical techniques for the forward and inverse problems. He is developing and applying those techniques to the modelling and imaging the Earth at different scales: from the near subsurface or laboratory scale to the Earth crust scale with some specific sites of study like the well monitored Pyrenees chain located between Spain and France. Seismic and gravity dense measurements are mainly used to obtain more information on both seismic wave velocities and densities in the Earth crust and to couple the structures to the surface using not only high resolution numerical tools but also more complex physics in solid-fluid mechanical systems. In 2017, Roland was awarded an Institute of Advanced Studies Robert and Maude Gledden Visiting Senior Fellowship.
Tuesday 11
18:00 - PUBLIC LECTURE - Numerical Modelling and Imaging in Geophysics at Different Scales: applications to the pyrenees chain and the subsurface/laboratory scale : A public lecture by Dr. Roland Martin, senior research scientist at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse 3, France. Website | More Information
In this lecture Dr Martin will present different high order numerical tools using finite-difference or finite element approaches to propagate seismic waves in a wide variety of Earth structures at different scales in order, in the near future, to couple them through different physics related to different frequency content of the sources involved. He will discuss two applications that could be linked in the future: the Pyrenees chain imaging at moderate source frequencies and wet/dry (non-)linear viscoelastic wave modelling in wet/dry/non-consolidated granular materials in the near surface. Dr Martin will present a hybrid inversion method that allows us to image density distributions at the regional scale using both seismic and gravity data. One main goal is to obtain densities and seismic wave velocities (P and S) in the lithosphere with a fine resolution to get important constraints on the mineralogic composition and thermal state of the lithosphere. In the context of the Pyrenees (located between Spain and France), accurate Vp and Vs seismic velocity models are computed first on a 3D spectral element grid at the scale of the Pyrenees by inverting teleseismic full waveforms. In a second step, Vp velocities are mapped to densities using empirical relations to build an a priori density model. BGI and BRGM Bouguer gravity anomaly data sets are then inverted on the same 3D spectral element grid as the Vp model at a resolution of 1-2 km by using high-order numerical integration formulae. This procedure opens the possibility to invert both teleseismic and gravity data on the same finite-element grid. It can handle topography of the free surface in the same spectral-element distorted mesh that is used to solve the wave equation, without performing extra interpolations between different grids and models. WGS84 elliptical Earth curvature, SRTM or ETOPO1 topographies are used. Dr Martin will reproduce numerically the response of seismic waves in granular/porous media at the laboratory scale (01.-10kHZ sources) and this will enable us to better understand the signals recorded close to the surface when high frequency content will be used to better image the near surface, in particular by taking into account seasonal water content variations and complex rheologies and steep seismic velocity gradients present in the first hundred meters depths. Dr. Roland Martin is a senior research scientist at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Université Paul Sabatier – Toulouse 3, France and has been working for many years in France where he obtained his PhD in Geophysics (1998). He has been a researcher in Mexico City (1999-2004) before integrating the French CNRS (equivalent to the Australian CSIRO) in 2005 at Pau University and GET laboratory in Toulouse. His main interests are the numerical modelling in geophysics at different scales using different numerical techniques for the forward and inverse problems. He is developing and applying those techniques to the modelling and imaging the Earth at different scales: from the near subsurface or laboratory scale to the Earth crust scale with some specific sites of study like the well monitored Pyrenees chain located between Spain and France. Seismic and gravity dense measurements are mainly used to obtain more information on both seismic wave velocities and densities in the Earth crust and to couple the structures to the surface using not only high resolution numerical tools but also more complex physics in solid-fluid mechanical systems. In 2017, Roland was awarded an Institute of Advanced Studies Robert and Maude Gledden Visiting Senior Fellowship.
Tuesday 18
9:00 - COURSE - Data Visualisation : Understanding how to display data Website | More Information
This course will cover topics such as:

-Presenting data for a single variable: Including an introduction to histograms, box plots, and bar graphs

-Visualisation of two or more variables: Including an introduction to scatterplots, pairs plots, parallel coordinate plot and variable-width stack bar charts

-Other plots and maps: Including a brief introduction to plots for time series, bubble plots and more

-Data Ink: Essential parts of a graphic, Tufte’s Data-Ink ratio and how to increase it

-Colour and perception: Colour palettes, preattentive features

-An introduction to ggplot2

 August 2017
Wednesday 23
9:00 - COURSE - Ground Support in Open Pit and Underground Mining Short Course : Three day short course Website | More Information
The course is designed to assist mining personnel involved with the design and implementation of mine ground support. Mine managers, mining engineers, mine geologists, mining supervisors and operators, suppliers of mine support equipment, mining contractors and mines inspectors may benefit from attending the course.

 September 2017
Friday 08
9:00 - EVENT - SUPERcomputing and BIG data for researchers Website | More Information
This event will showcase services and resources that Pawsey Supercomputing Centre can provide to UWA researchers to take their research to the next level. There will be time in the morning for existing users and potential users to have one-on-one assistance with Pawsey staff. This will be followed by presentations from Pawsey and existing UWA users of Pawsey then networking.

This event is ideal for researchers who:

• are interested in high-performance computing

• have large scale data issues

• want to see if their work can be taken to the next level by using powerful computing and data resources, or

• would like to influence the future of the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre

 October 2017
Tuesday 10
8:00 - SEMINAR - Strainburst in Mining Seminar - How to Mitigate the Consequences : Associated event - Ungerground Mining technology Conference 2017 in Sudbury, Canada Website | More Information
This new ACG seminar seeks to explore the latest technologies and methodologies used at mining operations to mitigate and manage strainburst risk. It is hoped that by learning more about these phenomena, successful methodologies to reduce the likelihood and consequences of strainbursting can be identified and shared. This will contribute to making deep mines safer and more sustainable in the future.
Wednesday 11
8:00 - CONFERENCE - First International Conference on Underground Mining Technology : Three day conference in Sudbury, Canada Website | More Information
This inaugural ACG event will provide opportunities for underground mining practitioners to explore the latest mining technologies and methodologies which will drive industry into the future. Underground mining technology has enabled many mines to access the Earth’s valuable resources at great depths. In Sudbury alone, five mines are currently operating at depths of greater than 1.5 km.
Thursday 12
15:00 - SEMINAR - “Multiscale model reduction for flows in heterogeneous porous media” More Information
Abstract We combine discrete empirical interpolation techniques, global mode decomposition methods, and local multiscale methods, to reduce the computational complexity associated with nonlinear flows in highly heterogeneous porous media. The resulting reduced-order approach enables a significant reduction in the flow problem size while accurately capturing the behaviour of fully-resolved solutions. Below we use of random boundary conditions in constructing snapshot vectors to build local basis functions. We show that by using only a few of these randomly generated snapshots, we can adequately approximate dominant modes of the solution space. Collaborators: Y. Efendiev, J.C. Galvis, M. Ghommem, E. Guildin, G. Li

Alternative formats: Default | XML


Top of Page
© 2001-2010  The University of Western Australia
Questions? Mail weboffice@uwa.edu.au