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Today's date is Wednesday, June 03, 2020
Faculty of Science
 April 2019
Tuesday 02
13:00 - SEMINAR - Measuring physical activity patterns using objective devices: Past, present, and future : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
There is emerging evidence that how individuals accumulate their physical activity and sedentary behaviour (e.g. bouts, breaks) each day may be important for health. It is possible to assess activity patterns using different objective monitors (e.g. ActiGraph, activPAL, etc), yet there is little consistency in which patterns are examined in children and adults. In this talk, A/Prof Ridgers will discuss her research that is focusing on understanding patterns of activity accumulation. She will describe ways that have been used measure activity patterns, and identify some of the historical and current challenges facing researchers. She will present research that has examined changes in patterns over time and within interventions, and how patterns are associated with health outcomes. She will finish with a discussion that highlights the importance of considering changes in activity across the activity spectrum (from sedentary to vigorous activity). Throughout the presentation, A/Prof Ridgers will highlight opportunities afforded by objective measures to assess activity patterns moving forwards.

A/Prof Nicola Ridgers is a researcher within the Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN) at Deakin University. Her program of research primarily focuses on the measurement of children’s physical activity patterns, examining factors that influence activity levels, and promoting physical activity using theory-based interventions. She currently holds a National Heart Foundation of Australia Future Leader Fellowship that is focusing on the accumulation of activity by youth and associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors.
Friday 05
12:00 - SEMINAR - admin-sms@uwa.edu.au : Targeting P-glyoprotein, endocytosis and the lysosome compartment as a novel anti-cancer stragegy of overcome cancer cell resistance More Information

13:00 - SEMINAR - Measuring physical activity patterns using objective devices: Past, present, and future : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
There is emerging evidence that how individuals accumulate their physical activity and sedentary behaviour (e.g. bouts, breaks) each day may be important for health. It is possible to assess activity patterns using different objective monitors (e.g. ActiGraph, activPAL, etc), yet there is little consistency in which patterns are examined in children and adults. In this talk, A/Prof Ridgers will discuss her research that is focusing on understanding patterns of activity accumulation. She will describe ways that have been used measure activity patterns, and identify some of the historical and current challenges facing researchers. She will present research that has examined changes in patterns over time and within interventions, and how patterns are associated with health outcomes. She will finish with a discussion that highlights the importance of considering changes in activity across the activity spectrum (from sedentary to vigorous activity). Throughout the presentation, A/Prof Ridgers will highlight opportunities afforded by objective measures to assess activity patterns moving forwards.
Wednesday 10
12:30 - PRESENTATION - Physics to fish with some whales on the side! Second International Indian Ocean Expedition 110°E repeat line : Prof. Lynnath Beckley presents on the month-long voyage that will repeat the 1960s Indian Ocean investigation. Website | More Information
In the 1960s, Australia made a significant contribution to the first International Indian Ocean Expedition. Now, nearly six decades later, a second Expedition is underway, and in May 2019 a multi-institutional team of 30 oceanographers will head offshore from Fremantle with the Australian Research Vessel Investigator to study the oceanography of the SE Indian Ocean. On this month-long voyage we will to repeat the 110°E line from the 1960s, examine multi-decadal change in the physics, chemistry and biology of the water column, investigate microbes and biogeochemistry especially related to nitrogen and study the pelagic food web from plankton through to mesopelagic lantern fishes. The voyage will also enable ground truthing of bio-optical quantities like sea surface colour recorded by satellites as well as an acoustic survey of whales. For comparison, some of our work will use the original techniques employed during the first Expedition but these will be supplemented by a host of modern techniques and electronic technology that will assist us in better understanding the pelagic ecosystem at the western edge of Australia’s Exclusive Economic Zone.
Thursday 11
12:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar Series : Analysis of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data in Proteomics and Cancer Research More Information
Friday 12
12:00 - EVENT - Bayliss Seminar Series : Towards machine learning in computational spectroscopy for isomers More Information
Towards machine learning in computational spectroscopy for isomers
Tuesday 23
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Markus Muellner - Tailor-made nanoparticles from molecular polymer brushes More Information

13:00 - SEMINAR - Surgical wound complications: improving prevention and outcomes : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Surgical wound complications such as dehiscence (SWD) are a significant issue that affect large numbers of patients and is almost certainly under-reported. The impact of SWD can be considerable: increased mortality, delayed hospital discharge, readmission, further surgery, delayed adjuvant treatment, suboptimal aesthetic outcome and impaired psychosocial wellbeing. Consequently, it is imperative to raise awareness of SWD and improve identification, prevention and management. Prevention of SWD comprises excellence in surgical practice, prevention of surgical site infection, reducing risk of healing impairment and use of interventional therapies such as single-use negative pressure wound therapy in appropriately identified high-risk patients. Management also involves a holistic approach that includes amelioration of impediments to healing, optimising conditions in the wound bed and using appropriate treatment modalities to ultimately close the wound. The need for international consensus on the core issues around SWD arose from the doctoral research of Kylie Sandy-Hodgetts. The process started with a meeting of an international group of surgical care experts in July 2017. Development of the subsequent consensus document included extensive review by the Core Expert Working Group and a Review Panel. This consensus document is aimed at clinicians in all care settings who work with patients with surgical incisions. The main objective of the document is to inspire clinicians to improve outcomes for patients by providing practical guidance on how to improve prevention and management of SWD.
Wednesday 24
13:00 - SEMINAR - Seeking the secret of longevity, deep in the sea : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Abstract: Professor Pierre Blier -Seeking the secret of longevity, deep in the sea. Delineating the physiological and biochemical causes of aging process in the animal kingdom is a highly active area of research not only because of potential benefits for human health but also because aging process is related to life history strategies (growth and reproduction) and to responses of organisms to environmental conditions and stress. In this presentation, I advocate studying bivalve species as models for revealing the determinants of species divergences in maximal longevity. This taxonomic group includes the longest living metazoan on earth (Arctica islandica), which insures the widest range of maximum life span when shorter living species are also included in the comparative model. This model can also be useful for uncovering factors modulating the pace of aging in given species by taking advantages of the wide disparity of lifespan among different populations of the same species. For example, maximal lifespan in different populations of A islandica range from approximately 36 years to over 500 years. In the last 15 years, research has revealed that either regulation or tolerance to oxidative stress is tightly correlated to longevity in this group which support further investigations on this taxon to unveil putative mechanistic links between Reactive Oxygen Species and aging process.

Bio: Pierre Blier is Professor of Evolutionary Physiology at the Université du Québec à Rimouski in Canada. He obtained a PhD at Laval University in Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry and has been invited professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the “Institution des Sciences de l’Évolution de Montpelleir and at the Linus Pauling Institute of Science. He is currently invited Scholar at Monash University. He has been interested in the evolution of mitochondria in animals (mostly ectotherms) for the last 30 years and worked on the links between evolution of mtDNA and mitochondrial phenotype. In the last 15 years he studied the mitochondrial characters potentially associated with lifespan animals.
Friday 26
13:00 - SEMINAR - Phenotypic consequences of mutation accumulations on mitochondria : School of Human Sciences Seminar Series Website | More Information
Abstract: Professor Dufresne France - Phenotypic consequences of mutation accumulations on mitochondria. Mitochondria are essential organelles that generate ATP necessary to sustain life via the oxidative phosphorylation. The mitochondrial genome is known to be sensitive to the accumulation of deleterious mutations due to its highly mutagenic environment. Yet we lack a complete understanding of the impact of spontaneous DNA mutations on heritable damages within the germ line and how these affect mitochondrial functions. Exposure to mutagenic environmental contaminants can accelerate mutation accumulation. However, little is known about how mutagenic compounds affect the scope and extent of the phenotypic effects of spontaneous mutations on the mitochondria. In this talk, I will present our recent work on the effects of mutation accumulations (MA) on mitochondrial traits and fitness in the microinvertebrate, Daphnia pulex. We used lines of Daphnia that were bottlenecked every generation for 120 generations under mild copper and benign conditions. We compared life history traits, mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial respiration in bottlenecked Daphnia lines to those of control lines (Daphnia that were kept in large numbers for the same period of time). Our results are the first to empirically demonstrate the alleged sensitivity of mitochondria to mutational load and point at modulation of mtDNA content as an important mitigation mechanism of mutational impacts.

Bio: France Dufresne is a professor of genetics at the Université du Québec à Rimouski. She obtained her Ph.D. in zoology from the university of Guelph. She held postdoctorate fellowships at the Université Laval and at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography (San Diego). She has major interests in genome size evolution, and more specifically in how increases in genome size through polyploidy affects adaptation to cold environments. Another major aspect of her studies is the evolution of sexual reproduction. She applies genetic and genomic tools to examine the evolutionary consequences of a lack of genetic recombination in her model system, Daphnia. Other areas of expertise in her laboratory include genetic connectivity and local adaptation in various marine invertebrate species and algae.

 May 2019
Wednesday 08
14:00 - SEMINAR - Grey literature searching for systematic reviews Website | More Information
Searching grey literature is an important step in ensuring that your systematic review is truly comprehensive. Come and learn some strategies and sources for searching grey literature, which includes everything that has not been published in a conventional sense.

18:00 - SEMINAR - Keep Calm and Stress Less : Mental Health with Dr Brockis Website | More Information
If feeling too stressed, it’s time to take back control and reconnect to that place of calm and inner peace! Stress is the most commonly cited challenge many of us face on a daily basis. Severe chronic stress puts us at risk of poor health and mood disorders including anxiety, depression and panic. In this workshop Dr Jenny Brockis will teach you how to recognise symptoms of stress or burnout before they become an issue and how to create your daily stress resilience toolkit and emergency stress response pack to call upon when necessary.

Dr. Jenny Brockis is an award-winning speaker, best-selling author and medical practitioner who believes that rather than ‘just getting by,’ we can all achieve greater success and life satisfaction by embracing the findings of the neuroscience. Long fascinated by the human brain and behaviour, Jenny shares her knowledge and expertise as easy to understand concepts and strategies that can be readily implemented to boost mental performance. Clients find her passion and enthusiasm for her topic infectious, inspiring real change in their business.
Friday 17
11:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series More Information
Cryo Electron Microscopy Application in Life-Science and Material-Science: prerequisites, instrumentation and methods.
Tuesday 21
18:00 - EVENT - HMS Postgraduate Course Information Evening Website | More Information
Are you interested in a career in Medicine, Dentistry, Podiatric Medicine or Pharmacy?

Bachelor’s degree holders or students who are in their first bachelor’s degree may be eligible to apply for graduate entry into one of the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences postgraduate professional degrees.

Come along to this course information evening for more information on how to:

- Explore postgraduate options in health and medicine

- Understand admission requirements and application processes

- Find out key dates and timelines

- Hear from current postgraduate students about their experience studying at UWA

- Have your questions answered one to one by current postgraduate students and academics at the conclusion of the presentation
Friday 24
12:00 - SEMINAR - Seminar Series : Theoretical and computational molecular science: from nonequilibrium systems to materials for sustainable energy applications More Information
Theoretical and computational molecular science: from nonequilibrium systems to materials for sustainable energy applications

Friday 31
12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Andrew Marshall: The reducer, the acetylator and the DNA replicator - Structural studies on essential Aspergillus fumigatus proteins. More Information

12:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Andrew Marshall – UWA Bond Lab More Information

 June 2019
Wednesday 05
11:00 - SEMINAR - Benchmark your research Website | More Information
Learn to use Web of Science and Incites to benchmark your research against your peers, your area of research and even the whole world.

11:00 - SEMINAR - Bayliss Seminar Series : Professor Luigi Cavallo - Tuning Vicinal and Remote Steric Effects in the Rationalization of Catalytic Behavior More Information

13:00 - SEMINAR - Postgraduate Showcase: Frontiers in Agriculture Website | More Information
Each year The UWA Institute of Agriculture hosts a postgraduate showcase where some of UWA's top PhD students present their research in agriculture and related areas. Join us for an afternoon of fantastic talks from seven PhD students in the UWA School of Agriculture and Environment, the UWA School of Molecular Sciences, and the UWA Law School, with an introduction by Prof Imelda Whelehan, Dean, Graduate Research School. Afternoon tea and refreshments provided.

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