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Today's date is Friday, June 21, 2019
Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Visual Arts
 November 2018
Saturday 03
9:30 - SEMINAR - The Insider's Guide to: Renaissance Rome : Artists giving shape to papal ambitions in Renaissance Rome Website | More Information
After an Imperial age of splendor, Rome went through centuries of decline. While the Renaissance took off in Florence, the Eternal City was nothing more than a provincial backwater in the fifteenth century. Successive popes tried to turn the tide by heavily investing in ambitious monuments, but it was Julius II, nicknamed the ‘Warrior Pope’, who successfully restored some of Rome’s former grandeur. Pope Julius commissioned the architect Bramante to rebuild St. Peter’s; he called Michelangelo to Rome to construct his magnanimous tomb and to paint the Sistine Ceiling and asked Raphael to decorate his private chambers. This lecture will shed light on how these and other artists gave shape to papal ambitions in Renaissance Rome.
Thursday 22
18:00 - EXHIBITION OPENING - UWA Design School Exhibition Opening : New work by School of Design students More Information
Contemporary work from Fine Arts, Architecture, Urban Design, Landscape Architecture students and BIM students.

 May 2019
Tuesday 14
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Venice and the Ottomans: a visual artistic journey between the Serenissima and Istanbul : Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA Website | More Information
A public talk by Dr Stefano Carboni, Director, Art Gallery of Western Australia.

The celebrated Venetian painter Gentile Bellini was sent by the Serenissima Republic to spend two years at the court of Mehmet II the Conqueror in Istanbul in 1479. This important moment in the cultural and artistic relationship between Venice and the Ottomans ushered in an Orientalist phase in Venetian painting and also inspired Turkish artists to portray Ottoman courtly figures in the “European” manner. No other city or European power from the Medieval and Renaissance periods can claim the complex and mutual closeness to the Islamic world that Venice enjoyed for many centuries. Progressively losing control over the Mediterranean waters that were to become the “Ottoman lake” and becoming sidelined by the new profitable transoceanic trade routes, Venice eventually became more closely aligned with the other European powers, losing her unique connection with the southern and eastern Mediterranean countries. The 15th and 16th centuries, therefore, represent a true “moment of vision” in the fecund relationship between two distant cultures.

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia. In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university. This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.
Wednesday 22
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Great Impressions – Rembrandt and the History of Printmaking More Information
A public lecture by Dr Susanne Meurer, School of Design (History of Art), UWA.

Rembrandt features amongst a select group of artists whose work proved influential across various media. He was never “just” a great painter, but also a prolific and innovative printmaker. Over four decades, he produced almost 300 etchings, many of which pushed the technical and expressive boundaries of printmaking. Above all, this lecture will argue, Rembrandt lent a new level of intimacy to the medium. By treating the printing plate like a sketch book, Rembrandt granted unparalleled insights into his working processes. The resulting prints defied their status as multiples and left a lasting impression not only on collectors, but also on generations of artists.

Rembrandt – 350th Anniversary Lecture Series

Rembrandt’s death took place 350 years ago this year, in 1669. Museums across the globe, from Amsterdam to the Arabian Gulf, are staging exhibitions to commemorate his artistic legacy, and a life that was far from a masterpiece. Sometimes dismissed contemptuously in his own time, the supreme genius of Rembrandt is now universally acknowledged. The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia is pleased to present a series of lectures offering insights into the artist’s life, his work and its reception.

 June 2019
Tuesday 18
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Missing Magnificence: tracing Catherine de Medici’s hidden cultural legacy : Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Italian Studies at UWA Website | More Information
A public talk by Professor Susan Broomhall, History, UWA.

2019 is also the 500th anniversary of the birth of Catherine de Medici. As queen consort, regent and queen mother, Catherine dominated sixteenth-century French political life. Embracing her Medici heritage, her cultural projects, from palaces and artworks, to ceramics and exotica, were widely reported (and critiqued) in her lifetime. But where can we see it today? This lecture explores Catherine's extensive cultural patronage and its legacy in Europe today, often hiding in plain sight.

2019 marks the 90th anniversary of the teaching of Italian language and culture at The University of Western Australia. In 1929, Francesco Vanzetti, an idiosyncratic and popular Venetian, offered the first courses in Italian. This was the first appointment of a lecturer in Italian in any Australian university. This lecture series, supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and by Italian Studies in the UWA School of Humanities, celebrates aspects of Italian language and culture, past and present.
Wednesday 19
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - The Global Rembrandt Website | More Information
A public lecture by Arvi Wattel, School of Design (History of Art), UWA.

A recurring image of Rembrandt is that of the solitary painter, retreating ever further into the privacy of his studio over the course of his career. Yet, the opposite could be said as well: Rembrandt was thoroughly connected to the social world of his time through patronage and his role as a teacher. There is one aspect of his social world, however, that remains under-emphasised – the artist’s engagement with global cultures. In the seventeenth century, Amsterdam - the city in which Rembrandt lived and worked - became increasingly more global: products from all over the world were available in shops and the population of the city changed significantly. This lecture explores Rembrandt's response to the ever-changing world around him.

Rembrandt’s death took place 350 years ago this year, in 1669. Museums across the globe, from Amsterdam to the Arabian Gulf, are staging exhibitions to commemorate his artistic legacy, and a life that was far from a masterpiece.

Sometimes dismissed contemptuously in his own time, the supreme genius of Rembrandt is now universally acknowledged. The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia is pleased to present a series of lectures offering insights into the artist’s life, his work and its reception.

 July 2019
Wednesday 24
18:00 - PUBLIC TALK - Finding Rembrandt in Love and Life Website | More Information
A public lecture by Dr Susan Broomhall, School of Humanities (History), UWA.

This lecture explores how the character of Rembrandt van Rijn is interpreted through place, gender and emotions in museums and heritage sites in the Netherlands today. It focuses on the cities of Leiden and Amsterdam, Rembrandt’s homes, and particularly, the role of women in shaping interpretations of Rembrandt’s life and work. Historical women in Rembrandt's life are increasingly employed as tools to understand the artist's mind in creative responses such as Peter Greenaway's 2006 film 'Nightwatching' or the 2009 Australian opera by Andrew Ford and Sue Smith, 'Rembrandt's Wife'. This lecture investigates how heritage sites have likewise co-opted Rembrandt's relationships with women, in a range of ways, in order to increase visitor engagement.

Rembrandt’s death took place 350 years ago this year, in 1669. Museums across the globe, from Amsterdam to the Arabian Gulf, are staging exhibitions to commemorate his artistic legacy, and a life that was far from a masterpiece. Sometimes dismissed contemptuously in his own time, the supreme genius of Rembrandt is now universally acknowledged. The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia is pleased to present a series of lectures offering insights into the artist’s life, his work and its reception.

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