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SEMINAR: Human skeletal remains associated with the mutiny of the VOC Retourschip Batavia, 1629: preliminary findings of the 2015/2016 field season

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Today's date is Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Human skeletal remains associated with the mutiny of the VOC Retourschip Batavia, 1629: preliminary findings of the 2015/2016 field season : School of Human Sciences (APHB) Seminar Series Other events...
The Seminar: On 4 June 1629, the Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC) retourschip Batavia wrecked on Morning Reef, in the Houtman Abrolhos, approximately 65 km off the Western Australian coast. The macabre events following the wrecking saw more than 100 individuals murdered over a three-month period, by mutineers attempting to subjugate surviving crew and passengers. The historical significance of the latter is well established, and has been reconstructed, through the analysis of an extensive archaeological record, both maritime and terrestrial. With specific reference to known discoveries of human skeletal remains, four individual burials were recovered on Beacon Island between 1960 to 1964; a further six individuals were recovered from a multiple grave that was excavated in stages between 1994 and 2001. A multi-disciplinary collaboration of national and international partners performed a remote sensing program involving magnetics and conductivity mapping and GPR profiling followed by a series of targeted excavations on Beacon Island in January and February of 2015, and November 2016; this included the excavation of the recently rediscovered location of the postcranial remains of a skull originally removed in 1964, in addition to excavations in the southern region of the island where a human molar was found 2013. The latter discovery proved fortuitous, with the excavation culminating in the discovery of an intact human burial at over one meter in depth. Further excavation in the area to the immediate north led to the discovery of a further two individuals buried in direct association, one on top of the other. In 2016 a further individual was found, along with ceramics. The aim of the present presentation is to briefly describe the skeletal remains of the 2015-16 field season, including their burial context, and preliminary analyses of their demographics (sex, age and stature), including descriptions of potential palaeopathology.

The Speaker: Daniel Franklin has an honours degree in bioarchaeology and a PhD in physical anthropology. He is currently an Associate Professor at the Centre for Forensic Anthropology, School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia. His research involves the validation and exploration of alternative approaches for the quantification of skeletal biology and to advocate its potential applications in the forensic sciences. He has published extensively in a variety of journals, most recently in the Journal of Forensic Sciences; Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology; American Journal of Physical Anthropology; and the International Journal of Legal Medicine.
Speaker(s) Daniel Franklin, Associate Professor & Director, Centre for Forensic Anthropology, School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia
Location Seminar room 1.81 (first floor) Anatomy building, The University of Western Australia
Contact Deborah Hull <deborah.hull@uwa.edu.au> : 6488 3313
URL http://www.aphb.uwa.edu.au/research/seminars
Start Tue, 30 May 2017 13:00
End Tue, 30 May 2017 14:00
Submitted by Deborah Hull <deborah.hull@uwa.edu.au>
Last Updated Wed, 26 Jul 2017 10:26
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